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08/26/2014 @ 12:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was moderate with two moderate M-Class solar flares, and a number of C-Class solar flares detected. Region 2146 located in the northwest quadrant was responsible for the majority of activity. The first event, an M2.0 solar flare at 15:10 UTC, was responsible for a 10cm radio burst, type II and IV radio emissions, and a bright coronal mass ejection (CME) that was directed mostly to the west. A slight Earth directed component is possible. Low energy proton levels reached enhanced levels following this event, but remain well below the minor radiation storm threshold. The second event, a shorter duration M3.9 flare at 20:21 UTC, generated a weaker CME that appears to be directed fully to the west and away from our planet. The active region remains magnetically complex and will remain a threat for an isolated M-Class event. All other visible regions are currently stable.

A reminder that a rise in geomagnetic activity will be possible during the next 24-48 hours due to the possibility of a couple of glancing blow CME impacts, along with the onset of a coronal hole solar wind stream. There is a lower chance for minor G1 level geomagnetic storming at high latitudes.

08/25/2014 @ 20:30 UTC Moderate Solar Flare Detected (M3.9)
Sunspot 2146 located in the northwest quadrant became very active on Monday. The region produced a pair of moderate M-Class solar flares. The first event, an M2.0 flare at 15:10 UTC, was associated with a 10cm radio burst, type II and IV radio emissions, and a bright coronal mass ejection (CME) that appears to be directed mostly to the west. A small enhancement in Earthbound proton levels was observed on Monday afternoon.

The second event, an M3.9 solar flare, was observed at 20:21 UTC. More details to follow regarding this event

08/25/2014 @ 17:05 UTC Moderate Solar Flare Detected (M2.0)
An M2.0 solar flare was observed around region 2146 at 15:11 UTC. The event was associated with a 10cm radio burst (TenFlare), along with Type II and IV radio emissions. A CME became visible in the latest LASCO C2 imagery. Because of the flare location, the plasma will likely be directed mostly to the west. More to follow regarding a possible Earth directed component. Imagery by SDO and LASCO C2

08/25/2014 @ 13:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning folks. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Monday courtesy of the HMI instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Solar activity declined to low levels with only very minor B-Class and low level C-Class solar flares being detected. The source of the eruptive M5.9 event on Sunday, region 2151, has been stable and currently holds a beta magnetic configuration. In the northwest quadrant, region 2146 showed some spot development during the past 12 hours and will remain a threat for an isolated M-Flare. Elsewhere, region 2149 has been fairly stable and will remain a threat for at least C-Class solar flares. All other visible regions were quiet.

As mentioned in my update on Sunday, the CME associated with the M5.9 event was directed to the east and should have no impact on our geomagnetic field.

08/23/2014 @ 13:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning and welcome to another weekend. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours declined to low levels with only C-Class solar flares detected. Region 2149 showed some signs of decay, but will remain a threat for an isolated M-Flare. New spot growth was observed around region 2146 which is located near center disk. All other visible regions, including sunspots 2143 and 2148 remain stable for the time being. A sunspot now coming into view off the southeast limb looks to be the return of old region 2130 from the previous rotation. We will get a better look at it as the day progresses.

Two faint and relatively slow moving coronal mass ejections detected on Friday following a pair of C-Class solar flares were observed in LASCO coronagraph imagery. As per the latest NOAA/SWPC update, the pair of plasma clouds could merge and deliver a glancing blow to our geomagnetic field by August 26. While geomagnetic storming is not currently in the forecast, we will wait for signs of an approaching shock front and provide updates when necessary.

08/22/2014 @ 11:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was moderate with two M-Flares and numerous C-Flares detected. Most of the flare activity is being observed around region 2149 (also pictured). The largest event was a moderate M3.4 event at 13:31 UTC. Another M-Flare, this time an M1.2, was observed around 2149 at 06:28 UTC. Neither event was associated with a noteworthy CME. The other sunspot of interest, region 2148, did show some signs of decay within the trailing section of the group, but will remain a threat for at least C-Class solar flares. All other regions, including sunspot 2143, are stable for now. Further flaring will remain possible as we head into the weekend with region 2149 being the largest threat.

08/21/2014 @ 14:20 UTC Moderate Solar Flare Detected (M3.4)
Finally a noteworthy solar flare to report. A new active region turning into view off the east limb produced a moderate M3.4 solar flare at 13:31 UTC Thursday. The sunspot is not yet in a good geoeffective position for Earth directed eruptions, so a potential CME would likely be directed away from Earth. Stay tuned for more updates. Image below by the Solar Dynamics Obseravatory (SDO) using the 131 angstroms channel.

08/21/2014 @ 11:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low with at least 10 low to mid level C-Class solar flares detected. The source of much of this activity is a new sunspot region now turning into view off the east limb (also pictured). We will get a better look at the sunspot during the next 24 hours. Region 2148 displayed gradual spot development during the past 24 hours and will remain a threat for at least C-Class solar flares. Also displaying new spot growth, region 2143 located in the southwest quadrant has been mostly stable. All other visible numbered regions are quiet for the time being. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours.

08/20/2014 @ 11:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low with only low level C-Flares detected. A new sunspot formed rapidly in the northeast quadrant and was numbered 2148 overnight. New spot growth was also observed around region 2146. All other visible regions were stable. There will remain a chance for at least C-Class solar flares.

A period of moderate geomagnetic storming (Kp=6) was observed at high latitudes following a prolonged period of negative Bz. Visible aurora was reported across many locations from the northern UK and Scandinavia. The storm was short lived however as the Bz/IMF component would eventually point north, a condition that is known to suppress geomagnetic activity. All of this took place in the wake of a relatively weak CME impact on Tuesday morning.

08/19/2014 @ 21:55 UTC Geomagnetic Storm in Progress
Minor geomagnetic storming (Kp=5) is being observed at high latitudes following a prolonged period of negative Bz. Sky watchers located at high latitudes should remain alert for visual aurora once it is dark outside. NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center has also issued a warning for possible G2 (Moderate) geomagnetic storming. All this takes place following an initially weak CME impact very early Tuesday morning.

08/19/2014 @ 16:55 UTC Solar Update
Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity is currently at very low levels with the Solar X-Rays below C1.0. Region 2144 is rotating onto the southwest limb and out of direct Earth view. All other visible numbered regions remain stable and are not considered a threat for strong solar flares. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours.

Geomagnetic conditions remain well below storm levels following a weak CME impact early Tuesday morning. The solar wind speed streaming past Earth is currently just above 400 km/s and the Bz/IMF component at -7 nT south. Minor geomagnetic activity will remain possible during the next 24 hours.

08/19/2014 @ 10:50 UTC Weak CME Impact
Attached data courtesy of the ACE space craft shows that a weak shock passage was observed overnight. A geomagnetic sudden impulse measuring 12nT was detected at 07:00 UTC. Solar wind speeds increased slightly to above 350 km/s and the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) has been variable. As of this update, only a very minor increase in geomagnetic activity is being detected. More updates to follow this morning when required.

08/18/2014 @ 14:15 UTC Solar Update
Good morning folks. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity is currently low. A minor C1.8 flare was observed around region 2147 at 13:55 UTC. All other visible regions were either stable or in a state of decay. There will remain a chance for isolated C-Class flares. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the most up to date space weather news and information.

08/17/2014 @ 13:25 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity declined to very low levels. Regions 2139, 2141 and 2144 are each stable, but will each remain a threat for at least C-Class solar flares. Elsewhere, region 2143 looks to be emerging again in the southeast quadrant. Old region 2126 from the previous rotation is now turning back into view off the southeast limb. We will get a better look at what remains of the active region during the next 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the most up to date space weather news and information.

08/16/2014 @ 03:20 UTC Coronal Mass Ejection Detected
A filament channel located in the southern hemisphere erupted on Friday and launched a plasma cloud into space. The partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME) may have an Earth directed component and could impact our geomagnetic field within 48-72 hours. An impact could possibly lead to high latitude aurora. More updates to follow once a CME tracking model becomes available.

08/15/2014 @ 11:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Solar activity remains at very low levels, although there is now a small but increasing chance for an isolated M-Flare. A number of low level B-Flares were observed around both regions 2139 and 2141. Both regions continued to evolve as they rotate across the northeast quadrant and could produce at least C-Class solar flares. All other visible regions remain stable. A new sunspot located in the southeast quadrant popped up during the past 12 hours and should be assigned number 2145 today. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the most up to date space weather news and information.

08/14/2014 @ 13:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity remains at very low levels. New sunspots 2141 (N15E65), 2142 (N05E60) and 2143 (S07E67) were numbered overnight, although 2142 is now already spotless. Existing sunspot group 2139 located in the northeast quadrant is the largest visible Earth facing region and could produce C-Class solar flares. All other regions remain quiet. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

08/13/2014 @ 14:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity continues at very low levels. Region 2139 expanded in both sunspot count and magnetic complexity, but has yet to produce a noteworthy solar flare. All other visible regions are stable. A bright coronal mass ejection was observed Tuesday evening originating from a location just behind the east limb. It is not directed towards our planet. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

08/12/2014 @ 22:30 UTC Coronal Mass Ejection Detected
The Earth facing side of the sun is quiet, but the farside is not. Another eruption was observed on Tuesday, this time from a location situated just beyond the northeast limb. Attached image below courtesy of LASCO shows the plasma cloud (aka coronal mass ejection or CME) leaving our star and is headed to the east and away from Earth. We will get a better look at the source region within the next 24-48 hours.

08/11/2014 @ 14:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity continues at very low to low levels. Departing region 2132, currently in an advanced state of decay, produced a low level C-Flare this morning as it rotates onto the west limb. The two remaining numbered regions (2135 and 2137) were quiet. A new region turning into view off the northeast limb does not appear to be magnetically complex. We will get a better view later today. Early Monday morning, a new sunspot appeared rapidly in the northwest quadrant, but is not yet a threat for strong solar flares. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

08/10/2014 @ 13:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity declined to very low levels this morning. Region 2132 continues to decay as it rotates toward the west limb. In the northern hemisphere, region 2135 continued to gradually decay as the lead and trailing spots moved further apart. Elsewhere, newly numbered region 2137 in the south expanded somewhat, but is not considered a threat for strong solar flares at this time. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

08/09/2014 @ 12:45 UTC Solar Update
Good morning and welcome to the weekend. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday. Earth facing solar activity during the past 24 hours remained at low levels. Region 2135 located in the northeast quadrant is currently the most complex visible sunspot region and is producing low level C-Class flares. In the southwest quadrant, region 2132 remains stable as it continues to move closer towards the west limb. All other regions are currently in a state of decay. A farsided coronal mass ejection (CME) was observed on Friday and was the result of a solar flare around old region 2126. The active region is still over a week away from returning back into view off the east limb. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

08/08/2014 @ 11:45 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours remained at low levels with only minor C-Class X-Ray activity detected. Regions 2130 and 2134 both continued to decay, while 2132 and 2135 remained relatively stable. There is currently a low chance for an isolated M-Class flare. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

08/07/2014 @ 12:15 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity is currently at low levels. Region 2132 was initially showing a delta magnetic signature within the center of the group, but it did weaken during the past 12 hours. Despite this, the region will remain a lower threat for an isolated M-Flare. Newly numbered region 2135 located in the northeast quadrant formed rapidly on Wednesday and is currently stable. All other visible regions were either stable or in a state of decay. New spot growth was observed just to the south of region 2127, but will soon begin to rotate onto the west limb during the next 24 hours. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

08/05/2014 @ 13:10 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours remained low. All visible sunspot regions were either stable or in a state of decay. Minor C-Class solar flares will be likely. A small chance for an isolated M-Flare will remain in place as well. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

08/04/2014 @ 13:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low. A coronal mass ejection (CME) was observed last night following a minor flare beyond the west limb. This should have no impact on our planet. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Flare, with regions 2130 and 2132 being the most likely source. A large filament located in the northern hemisphere remains anchored in place and should continue to be monitored. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

08/03/2014 @ 12:45 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low. The strongest X-Ray event during the past day was a minor C2.5 flare around region 2132 at 03:12 UTC. A faint, but fast moving coronal mass ejection (CME) was observed following the flare. Coronagraph imagery shows it heading to the southeast and away from Earth. Region 2132 is showing signs of minor decay, but will remain a threat for an isolated M-Class flare. Regions 2127 and 2130 are both stable. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

08/02/2014 @ 13:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity since the M-Class activity on Friday (M2.0 and M1.5) has been relatively low with only minor C-Class flares detected. The M1.5 flare observed on Friday around region 2127 produced a coronal mass ejection (CME) that was directed to the south and should have little to no impact on our geomagnetic field. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class event today, with regions 2127, 2130 and 2132 being the most likely source. A pair of new regions were numbered overnight, including sunspot 2134 which looks to be the return of old region 2113 from the previous rotation.

An enhanced solar wind stream was responsible for a brief period of elevated geomagnetic activity last night (KP=4). There is still a chance that a CME observed on July 30 could deliver a weak glancing blow impact and lead to disturbed conditions. Minor geomagnetic storming is not likely however.

08/01/2014 @ 12:35 UTC Solar Update
Welcome to the month of August. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity declined to somewhat lower levels during the past 24 hours. Region 2132 was responsible for the strongest X-Ray event, a minor C8.6 solar flare at 00:18 UTC. The active region continues to expand both in size and magnetic complexity and will be a threat for an isolated M-Class event. The other sunspot of interest, region 2130, produced a minor C4 flare at 11:42 UTC. All other visible regions are currently stable. An eruption this morning in the northern hemisphere near center disk may have generated a coronal mass ejection, however updated coronagraph imagery is required to determine this.

07/31/2014 @ 14:30 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours increased to moderate levels thanks to an M2.5 solar flare around region 2130 at 11:14 UTC. The active region will remain a threat for isolated solar flares as it continues to rotate into a more geoeffective position. Region 2121 located in the northwest quadrant showed some new spot development during the past 12 hours, but remained stable. The other region of interest, sunspot 2127, produced a number of C-Flares on Wednesday and will remain a threat for an isolated M-Flare event. All other regions were quiet. A new sunspot is forming to the southeast of 2130 and could be assigned number 2132 later today.

According to the latest NOAA update, the CME resulting from a filament eruption Wednesday morning could deliver a minor glancing blow by August 2nd. Based on coronagraph imagery, if there is an Earth directed component, I do not expect much in the way of a noteworthy impact to our geomagnetic field. Nonetheless, sky watchers at high latitudes should remain alert in the days ahead.

07/31/2014 @ 11:30 UTC Moderate Solar Flare Detected (M2.5)
At long last, a solar flare stronger than C-Class. A moderate M2.5 flare event was observed around region 2130 at 11:14 UTC Thursday morning. This is the first M-Flare since July 10th. More updates to follow if a coronal mass ejection (CME) happens to be associated with this event. Region 2130 continues to move into a better geoeffective position. Image below by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) using the 131 angstroms channel.

07/30/2014 @ 14:35 UTC Solar Update
Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday morning. Solar activity during the past 24 hours remained low. Additional C-Class flares will remain possible, particularly around regions 2126, 2127 and 2130. An isolated M-Class flare is also a lesser possibility. Updated imagery by LASCO C3 shows a coronal mass ejection (CME) heading north of the ecliptic following a filament eruption early Wednesday morning. There is a gap in updated imagery, so a better analysis will be provided once available. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/29/2014 @ 14:45 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. The sunspot count continues to rebound, although solar activity still remains at low levels. New region 2130 (ex-2109) continues to rotate back into view off the west limb and will be a likely source for at least C-Class solar flares. Now located in the southwest quadrant, region 2126 did show gradual spot growth and consolidation during the past 24 hours. It too will remain a threat for at least C-Class solar flares. All other visible regions are currently stable. Overall there is about at 15% chance for an isolated M-Class event. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/28/2014 @ 12:45 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low. New region 2129 was numbered after it formed to the north of region 2126 in the southern hemisphere. There will remain a chance for minor C-Class solar flares. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Our geomagnetic field is currently under the influence of a weak coronal hole stream. Geomagnetic storming is not expected at this time. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/24/2014 @ 15:45 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low. Region 2121 produced a minor C2.1 flare at 01:51 UTC. All other visible regions remained stable. Additional isolated C-Flares will be possible during the next 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/23/2014 @ 17:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was very low. New region 2121 was numbered as it continues to rotate into Good afternoon. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity continues at very low levels. Sunspot 2121 is currently the largest visible Earth facing region and remains stable. A new sunspot trailing region 2122 in the southeast quadrant continues to slowly form and could be numbered 2123 today. There will remain a chance for isolated C-Class solar flares. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/22/2014 @ 11:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was very low. New region 2121 was numbered as it continues to rotate into view off the east limb. Another new sunspot is forming in the southeast quadrant and should be assigned number 2122. Both are currently stable. Region 2119, located in the southwest quadrant, remains quiet. There is currently at chance for C-Class solar flares. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/20/2014 @ 13:05 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Solar activity during the past 24 hours remained at very low levels. Region 2119 is currently the largest visible Earth facing region and is not considered a threat for strong solar flares. Newly numbered sunspot 2120 located in the northern hemisphere is a small, magnetically simple, non threatening region. A prominence eruption was observed off the east limb and flung a coronal mass ejection (CME) into space. No impact to our geomagnetic field is expected. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/19/2014 @ 16:20 UTC Solar Update
Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity remained quiet during the past 24 hours. The visible disk consists of two simple regions, 2118 in the north, and 2119 in the south. There is currently a small chance for isolated C-Class flares. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/18/2014 @ 14:15 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was very low. Small new region 2118 was numbered after forming in the northern hemisphere and ends the short lived spotless period. It is not considered a threat for strong solar flares. A second region popped up this morning in the southeast quadrant and is currently a very simple beta magnetic region.No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed in coronagraph imagery during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/17/2014 @ 12:35 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Okay, Technically this is a picture of an orange, but our visible disk looks very similar today. Region 2113 faded away leaving the Earth facing side of the sun spotless for the first time since August 14, 2011. This will be made official later today just as long as 2113 remains a spotless plage. We will likely see more periods of active sunspots during the next year or so, but a gradual downward turn in overall activity is inevitable. Solar activity should continue at very low levels today. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/16/2014 @ 14:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Okay, Technically this is a picture of an orange, but our visible disk looks very similar today. Region 2113 faded away leaving the Earth facing side of the sun spotless for the first time since August 14, 2011. This will be made official later today just as long as 2113 remains a spotless plage. We will likely see more periods of active sunspots during the next year or so, but a gradual downward turn in overall activity is inevitable. Solar activity should continue at very low levels today. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/14/2014 @ 14:15 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Solar activity continues to decline as visible sunspots either decay or rotate past the west limb and out of direct Earth view. Region 2109 will remain a threat for at least C-Class solar flares while it remains in view. All other visible regions are not considered a threat for strong solar flares at this time. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours.

ACE spacecraft data indicates what appears to be a very minor shock passage this morning. Geomagnetic storming is not currently expected.

07/13/2014 @ 15:30 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity remained at low levels during the past 24 hours. Region 2109 produced a C6.4 flare at 09:03 UTC. This region will soon begin to rotate onto the west limb and out of direct view. Region 2108, now located on the west limb, produced a number of low level C-Class solar flares. All other visible regions are currently stable. The risk of moderate flare activity should gradually decline as 2108 and 2109 rotate out of direct Earth view. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/11/2014 @ 12:35 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was moderate. Region 2106 produced an M1.5 solar flare at 22:34 UTC Thursday evening. The active region is now rotating out of view and onto the west limb. Elsewhere, large sunspot 2108 is showing some minor spot formation this morning, while 2109 continued in a slow decay trend. New spot growth was observed to the east of region 2113. All other regions are currently stable this morning. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class flare event as we close out the week. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/10/2014 @ 11:00 UTC Prominence Eruption
A prominence eruption was observed Thursday morning off the western limb and it generated a bright, westerly directed coronal mass ejection (CME). Although the CME is significant, it should have little to no impact on our geomagnetic field. Imagery by SDO and LASCO.

07/09/2014 @ 16:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning, or afternoon in some cases. Below is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was moderate. Region 2113 produced a pair of moderate M-Class flares. The first, an M6.5 event on Tuesday at 16:20 UTC, produced a coronal mass ejection (CME) that was directed away from our planet and is not expected to impact our geomagnetic field. The second event, an M1.2 flare at 00:26 UTC, was responsible for a very weak CME that should have no impact on our planet. Region 2113 was in a development phase on Tuesday, but has since showed signs of decay on Wednesday. Another moderate solar flare is still possible around this region, but less likely. All other visible regions, including 2108 and 2109 are currently stable. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/08/2014 @ 16:55 UTC Moderate Solar Flare Detected (M6.5)
Expanding region 2113 located in the northeast quadrant just produced an M6.5 solar flare at 16:20 UTC Tuesday. The event was associated with a Type IV radio emission. Additional imagery by SDO suggests a large quantity of plasma was flung into space, but is likely directed away from our planet. More updates to follow once coronagraph imagery becomes available.

07/08/2014 @ 15:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Solar activity during the past 24 hours remained low with a C4.0 flare observed around region 2113 at 09:02 UTC. This region expanded considerably during the past day with a number of small new spots added to its repertoire. Region 2113 should be monitored for additional growth as the day unfolds. Large (and mostly stable) sunspots 2108 and 2109 continue their transit of the southern hemisphere and will remain a threat for an isolated M-Class event. New sunspots 2114 and 2115 were numbered and are not considered a large threat for strong solar flares at this time. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/06/2014 @ 15:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low. Regions 2108 and 2109 remain the most threatening Earth facing regions. There will continue to be a chance for an isolated M-Class flare. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/05/2014 @ 13:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday. Despite the sunspot count, solar activity remained at low levels. Both sunspots 2108 and 2109 continue to be in a growth phase as they both rotate into a better geoeffective position. Regions 2104 and 2107, both currently directly facing our planet, remain stable. Regions 2100, 2102 and 2106, each located in the northern hemisphere, are showing signs of decay. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class event as we begin the weekend.

07/04/2014 @ 13:45 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity remains low with only minor C-Class activity detected within the past 24 hours. Both regions 2108 and 2109 showed signs of expansion as they rotate across the southeast quadrant. All other visible sunspot regions remain stable for the time being. A new sunspot rotating into view off the east limb was numbered 2111 overnight. A threat for an isolated M-Class event will remain in place.

07/03/2014 @ 12:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity continues at low levels with only minor C-Class flares detected. In the southeast quadrant, region 2104 decayed slightly, but still remains the most complex visible Earth facing region. Region 2108 also showed some signs of decay as it rotates into a better position. In the northeast, region 2106 sprung a few new sunspots, but remains mostly stable for the time being. All other visible sunspot regions, including 2107 and 2109 remain stable. A small new sunspot was numbered 2110 overnight. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day.

A very minor increase in geomagnetic activity (Kp3) was observed following a weak shock passage and a period of southward Bz. No geomagnetic storms are currently in the forecast.

07/02/2014 @ 12:45 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity remains low with only insignificant C-Class flares being observed so far today. All visible regions, including 2104, 2106 and 2107 remain mostly stable for the time being. Newly numbered region 2108 located in the southeast quadrant also remains stable as it turns into view. A new sunspot trailing 2108 continues to rotate into view off the east limb and should be assigned number 2109 later today. Additional coronal mass ejections are visible today and each appear to have originated from activity behind the east limb. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com where you can monitor all of the latest space weather data and imagery.

07/01/2014 @ 12:30 UTC Solar Update
Good morning and welcome to the month of July. Happy Canada Day to all fellow Canadians. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours increased to moderate levels. A number of C-Class flares were observed around regions 2106, 2107 and off the east limb. The largest event, an M1.4 flare around region 2106, was observed at 11:23 UTC. There will remain a chance for minor to moderate solar flares today, particularly around regions 2104, 2106 and 2107. A few coronal mass ejections were detected in LASCO C2 coronagraph imagery, however each were either farsided or directed away from our planet. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com where you can monitor all of the latest space weather data and imagery.

06/29/2014 @ 13:30 UTC Solar Update
Old sunspots 2080 (since renumbered 2104) and 2085 are rotating back into view off the southeast limb. Both regions are currently producing C-Class solar flares having survived the trek around the farside of the sun. Both appear to be a threat for an isolated M-Class solar flare event. Old sunspot 2082 from the previous rotation is rotating back into view off the northeast limb, but appears to be in an advanced state of decay. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information. Image below courtesy of HMI/SDO.


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