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07/23/2014 @ 17:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was very low. New region 2121 was numbered as it continues to rotate into Good afternoon. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity continues at very low levels. Sunspot 2121 is currently the largest visible Earth facing region and remains stable. A new sunspot trailing region 2122 in the southeast quadrant continues to slowly form and could be numbered 2123 today. There will remain a chance for isolated C-Class solar flares. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/22/2014 @ 11:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was very low. New region 2121 was numbered as it continues to rotate into view off the east limb. Another new sunspot is forming in the southeast quadrant and should be assigned number 2122. Both are currently stable. Region 2119, located in the southwest quadrant, remains quiet. There is currently at chance for C-Class solar flares. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/20/2014 @ 13:05 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Solar activity during the past 24 hours remained at very low levels. Region 2119 is currently the largest visible Earth facing region and is not considered a threat for strong solar flares. Newly numbered sunspot 2120 located in the northern hemisphere is a small, magnetically simple, non threatening region. A prominence eruption was observed off the east limb and flung a coronal mass ejection (CME) into space. No impact to our geomagnetic field is expected. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/19/2014 @ 16:20 UTC Solar Update
Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity remained quiet during the past 24 hours. The visible disk consists of two simple regions, 2118 in the north, and 2119 in the south. There is currently a small chance for isolated C-Class flares. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/18/2014 @ 14:15 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was very low. Small new region 2118 was numbered after forming in the northern hemisphere and ends the short lived spotless period. It is not considered a threat for strong solar flares. A second region popped up this morning in the southeast quadrant and is currently a very simple beta magnetic region.No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed in coronagraph imagery during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/17/2014 @ 12:35 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Okay, Technically this is a picture of an orange, but our visible disk looks very similar today. Region 2113 faded away leaving the Earth facing side of the sun spotless for the first time since August 14, 2011. This will be made official later today just as long as 2113 remains a spotless plage. We will likely see more periods of active sunspots during the next year or so, but a gradual downward turn in overall activity is inevitable. Solar activity should continue at very low levels today. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/16/2014 @ 14:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Okay, Technically this is a picture of an orange, but our visible disk looks very similar today. Region 2113 faded away leaving the Earth facing side of the sun spotless for the first time since August 14, 2011. This will be made official later today just as long as 2113 remains a spotless plage. We will likely see more periods of active sunspots during the next year or so, but a gradual downward turn in overall activity is inevitable. Solar activity should continue at very low levels today. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/14/2014 @ 14:15 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Solar activity continues to decline as visible sunspots either decay or rotate past the west limb and out of direct Earth view. Region 2109 will remain a threat for at least C-Class solar flares while it remains in view. All other visible regions are not considered a threat for strong solar flares at this time. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours.

ACE spacecraft data indicates what appears to be a very minor shock passage this morning. Geomagnetic storming is not currently expected.

07/13/2014 @ 15:30 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity remained at low levels during the past 24 hours. Region 2109 produced a C6.4 flare at 09:03 UTC. This region will soon begin to rotate onto the west limb and out of direct view. Region 2108, now located on the west limb, produced a number of low level C-Class solar flares. All other visible regions are currently stable. The risk of moderate flare activity should gradually decline as 2108 and 2109 rotate out of direct Earth view. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/11/2014 @ 12:35 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was moderate. Region 2106 produced an M1.5 solar flare at 22:34 UTC Thursday evening. The active region is now rotating out of view and onto the west limb. Elsewhere, large sunspot 2108 is showing some minor spot formation this morning, while 2109 continued in a slow decay trend. New spot growth was observed to the east of region 2113. All other regions are currently stable this morning. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class flare event as we close out the week. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/10/2014 @ 11:00 UTC Prominence Eruption
A prominence eruption was observed Thursday morning off the western limb and it generated a bright, westerly directed coronal mass ejection (CME). Although the CME is significant, it should have little to no impact on our geomagnetic field. Imagery by SDO and LASCO.

07/09/2014 @ 16:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning, or afternoon in some cases. Below is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was moderate. Region 2113 produced a pair of moderate M-Class flares. The first, an M6.5 event on Tuesday at 16:20 UTC, produced a coronal mass ejection (CME) that was directed away from our planet and is not expected to impact our geomagnetic field. The second event, an M1.2 flare at 00:26 UTC, was responsible for a very weak CME that should have no impact on our planet. Region 2113 was in a development phase on Tuesday, but has since showed signs of decay on Wednesday. Another moderate solar flare is still possible around this region, but less likely. All other visible regions, including 2108 and 2109 are currently stable. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/08/2014 @ 16:55 UTC Moderate Solar Flare Detected (M6.5)
Expanding region 2113 located in the northeast quadrant just produced an M6.5 solar flare at 16:20 UTC Tuesday. The event was associated with a Type IV radio emission. Additional imagery by SDO suggests a large quantity of plasma was flung into space, but is likely directed away from our planet. More updates to follow once coronagraph imagery becomes available.

07/08/2014 @ 15:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Solar activity during the past 24 hours remained low with a C4.0 flare observed around region 2113 at 09:02 UTC. This region expanded considerably during the past day with a number of small new spots added to its repertoire. Region 2113 should be monitored for additional growth as the day unfolds. Large (and mostly stable) sunspots 2108 and 2109 continue their transit of the southern hemisphere and will remain a threat for an isolated M-Class event. New sunspots 2114 and 2115 were numbered and are not considered a large threat for strong solar flares at this time. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/06/2014 @ 15:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low. Regions 2108 and 2109 remain the most threatening Earth facing regions. There will continue to be a chance for an isolated M-Class flare. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

07/05/2014 @ 13:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday. Despite the sunspot count, solar activity remained at low levels. Both sunspots 2108 and 2109 continue to be in a growth phase as they both rotate into a better geoeffective position. Regions 2104 and 2107, both currently directly facing our planet, remain stable. Regions 2100, 2102 and 2106, each located in the northern hemisphere, are showing signs of decay. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class event as we begin the weekend.

07/04/2014 @ 13:45 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity remains low with only minor C-Class activity detected within the past 24 hours. Both regions 2108 and 2109 showed signs of expansion as they rotate across the southeast quadrant. All other visible sunspot regions remain stable for the time being. A new sunspot rotating into view off the east limb was numbered 2111 overnight. A threat for an isolated M-Class event will remain in place.

07/03/2014 @ 12:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity continues at low levels with only minor C-Class flares detected. In the southeast quadrant, region 2104 decayed slightly, but still remains the most complex visible Earth facing region. Region 2108 also showed some signs of decay as it rotates into a better position. In the northeast, region 2106 sprung a few new sunspots, but remains mostly stable for the time being. All other visible sunspot regions, including 2107 and 2109 remain stable. A small new sunspot was numbered 2110 overnight. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day.

A very minor increase in geomagnetic activity (Kp3) was observed following a weak shock passage and a period of southward Bz. No geomagnetic storms are currently in the forecast.

07/02/2014 @ 12:45 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity remains low with only insignificant C-Class flares being observed so far today. All visible regions, including 2104, 2106 and 2107 remain mostly stable for the time being. Newly numbered region 2108 located in the southeast quadrant also remains stable as it turns into view. A new sunspot trailing 2108 continues to rotate into view off the east limb and should be assigned number 2109 later today. Additional coronal mass ejections are visible today and each appear to have originated from activity behind the east limb. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com where you can monitor all of the latest space weather data and imagery.

07/01/2014 @ 12:30 UTC Solar Update
Good morning and welcome to the month of July. Happy Canada Day to all fellow Canadians. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours increased to moderate levels. A number of C-Class flares were observed around regions 2106, 2107 and off the east limb. The largest event, an M1.4 flare around region 2106, was observed at 11:23 UTC. There will remain a chance for minor to moderate solar flares today, particularly around regions 2104, 2106 and 2107. A few coronal mass ejections were detected in LASCO C2 coronagraph imagery, however each were either farsided or directed away from our planet. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com where you can monitor all of the latest space weather data and imagery.

06/29/2014 @ 13:30 UTC Solar Update
Old sunspots 2080 (since renumbered 2104) and 2085 are rotating back into view off the southeast limb. Both regions are currently producing C-Class solar flares having survived the trek around the farside of the sun. Both appear to be a threat for an isolated M-Class solar flare event. Old sunspot 2082 from the previous rotation is rotating back into view off the northeast limb, but appears to be in an advanced state of decay. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information. Image below courtesy of HMI/SDO.

06/28/2014 @ 12:55 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low with a number of minor C-Class flares observed off the east limb. Returning regions 2080, 2082, and 2085 are expected to rotate back into view during the next few days. All visible Earth facing regions, including newly numbered regions 2102 and 2103 are currently stable. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day.

06/27/2014 @ 12:10 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Solar activity on the Earth facing side of the sun remains fairly quiet. All visible Earth facing regions, including newly numbered sunspots 2099 and 2100 remain stable. There will remain a chance for minor C-Class flares around these regions. The chances for stronger flares may increase starting this weekend when one or more regions return into view off the east limb. We won't know for sure until we have a look at what remains of the former active regions. We do know that old region 2082 behind the northeast limb was responsible for an eruption last night that produced a bright non Earth directed coronal mass ejection (CME). Stay tuned for the latest information.

06/26/2014 @ 11:35 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity remained at low levels during the past 24 hours. Region 2096 produced a minor C2.2 flare at 09:18 UTC. All other visible regions, including newly re-emerged sunspot 2093, remain stable for the time being. Solar activity should remain at low levels in the short term. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

06/25/2014 @ 12:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours remained at low levels with no significant flare activity detected. All three visible numbered regions are stable. A filament eruption was observed in the suns northern hemisphere overnight, however the resulting coronal mass ejection (CME) was rather faint and directed north of the Sun-Earth line. Solar activity is expected to remain at very low to low levels in the short term.

06/24/2014 @ 12:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low. The largest event was a C2.1 flare off the southwest limb at 00:29 UTC. A number of very minor B-Flares are being detected around a potential active region still behind the east limb. The visible disk, as seen in the attached image, is down to three non complex regions, including newly numbered sunspot group 2098 located in the southeast quadrant. There is currently a chance for minor C-Class solar flares. A coronal mass ejection (CME) became visible early this morning in the latest LASCO C2 imagery. This was the result of a farsided filament eruption and is not directed towards our planet.

A minor shock passage was observed Monday evening at 23:08 UTC. Solar wind speeds as measured by the ACE spacecraft increased to near 400 km/s and the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) initially pointed slightly south (-4nT). The impact to our geomagnetic field was weak and did not result in a geomagnetic storm.

06/23/2014 @ 13:35 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity remains very low with no noteworthy solar flares to report. All visible sunspot regions are currently inactive. Regions 2090 and 2092 are about to rotate onto the west limb. In the center of the disk, region 2093 continues to slowly decay and is not considered a threat for strong solar flares. In the northeast, regions 2096 and 2097 are stable. With the overall decrease in visible sunspots, the 10.7cm Solar Flux index dropped to below 100 (94).

06/22/2014 @ 13:55 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity this morning is at very low levels. All visible sunspot regions are stable. Region 2087 continues to decay as it rotates onto the west limb. New sunspot 2096 was numbered after rotating into view off the northeast limb and does not appear to be a threat for large solar flares at this time.

A geomagnetic storm watch is in effect beginning later today due to the possibility of a weak glancing blow coronal mass ejection (CME) impact. Overall, the chances of an actual geomagnetic storm unfolding is quite low as the CME observed on June 19 was directed mostly away from our planet.

06/21/2014 @ 13:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning and welcome to the first day of summer in the northern hemisphere (summer solstice). Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk. Solar activity during the past 24 hours remained at low levels. All visible sunspot regions, including 2087 and 2093 are currently stable. Region 2087 will soon rotate onto the west limb and out of direct Earth view. There will remain a chance for at least C-Class solar flares.

A filament channel located in the suns northern hemisphere erupted last night and generated a non Earth directed coronal mass ejection (CME).

A minor geomagnetic storm watch is in effect beginning on Sunday. NOAA issued the watch based on the lower possibility of a glancing blow CME impact. The CME was the result of a southern hemisphere filament eruption on June 19. More updates to follow regarding this on Sunday.

06/20/2014 @ 12:35 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low. Region 2093 is showing new spot growth this morning and was responsible for a C5 solar flare at 11:20 UTC. On Thursday, a filament eruption near 2093 hurled a coronal mass ejection (CME) into space and was directed mostly away from our planet. According to NOAA, a minor glancing blow at best will be possible by late on June 22. Geomagnetic storming is not likely. All other visible Earth facing regions are currently stable

06/19/2014 @ 12:35 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity is at very low levels with no noteworthy solar flares observed during the past 24 hours. Region 2089 is rotating onto the west limb and will soon be out of direct Earth view. All other regions, including once threatening sunspot 2087 are either stable or in a state of decay. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day.

An enhanced solar wind stream contributed to a brief period of minor geomagnetic storming (Kp=5) at high latitudes. Geomagnetic conditions have since returned to quieter levels.

06/19/2014 @ 02:15 UTC Geomagnetic Storm in Progress
Increased geomagnetic activity reaching minor storm levels is being observed at high latitudes this evening. An elevated solar wind stream is contributing to the enhanced activity. Sky watchers located high in latitude should remain alert tonight if it is dark outside.

06/18/2014 @ 14:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was initially at low levels, but did decline to very low levels (X-Rays below C-Class) this morning. All visible sunspot regions, including 2087 and 2089 are stable for the time being. Minor C-Class solar flares will remain a possibility today with a lower threat for an isolated M-Class event. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day.

06/17/2014 @ 11:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low. A number of minor C-Class solar flares were observed around regions 2087, 2089 and 2093. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class event, with regions 2087 and 2089 being the most likely source. A coronal mass ejection (CME) is just now becoming visible this morning in the latest LASCO C2 coronagraph imagery. So far it appears to be heading to the south and away from our planet.

06/16/2014 @ 14:40 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was moderate. The largest event was an M1.0 solar flare around region 2087 at 00:01 UTC. Numerous C-Class flares were also detected around region 2089 and from just beyond the southwest limb.There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class solar flare today. New regions 2093 and 2094 were numbered after rotating into view off the southeast limb. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours.

06/15/2014 @ 17:00 UTC Solar Update
Good afternoon. Happy father's day to all the dads. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was moderate with a pair of M-Class flares detected. An M1.4 flare was observed yesterday off the east limb at 19:29 UTC. The event generated a non Earth directed coronal mass ejection. The responsible active region is now rotating into view and is currently stable. Earlier this morning, departing region 2085 produced a long duration M1.1 flare. Both active regions 2080 and 2085 are now out of direct Earth view. In the southeast quadrant, previously threatening region 2087 continues to gradually decay and is no longer a main threat for strong solar flares. In the northern hemisphere, region 2089 expanded during the past day and is a threat for M-Class solar flares.

06/14/2014 @ 12:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity declined to low levels with only minor C-Class flares detected within the past 24 hours. Regions 2080 and 2085 continue to make their way onto the west limb and will soon be out of direct Earth view. Any eruptions around these regions at this point will be directed away from our planet. The other sunspot of interest, region 2087 located in the southeast quadrant, lost its delta magnetic configuration and is stable for the time being. It will remain a threat for an isolated M-Class event. In the northern hemisphere, region 2089 is showing signs of growth and will remain a threat for at least C-Class solar flares. All other regions were either stable or in a state of decay. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours.

06/13/2014 @ 11:10 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is a look at some of the recent events from the past 24 hours. Solar activity was moderate with a number of M-Class solar flares detected around sunspots.2085, 2087 and 2089. Region 2085 was responsible for the largest of these events, a long duration M3.1 flare peaking at 22:16 UTC Thursday evening. This was associated with Type II and IV radio emissions, along with a short duration radio burst (TenFlare). A bright coronal mass ejection (CME) became visible following the event and appears to be headed mostly to the southwest and away from our planet. A slight enhancement in proton levels was noted, but remained well below the minor radiation storm threshold. Region 2087 produced a moderate M2.6 flare this morning at 07:56 UTC and was responsible for a Type II radio emission with an estimated velocity of 959 km/s. A noteworthy CME is not visible when viewing the latest STEREO Behind COR2 imagery. Both regions 2080 and 2085 will remain a threat for isolated moderate to strong solar flares as they rotate towards the west limb. In the southeast quadrant, region 2087 remains magnetically complex as it rotates into a more geoeffective Earth facing position. Isolated moderate to strong solar flares will remain a possibility around 2087 as we head into the weekend. All other visible regions are currently stable this morning.

06/13/2014 @ 01:05 UTC Moderate Solar Flare Detected (M3.1)
A long duration eruption measuring M3.1 was observed Thursday evening around regions 2080-2085. The event was associated with a Type II Radio Emission with an estimated velocity of over 1600 km/s, a Type IV emission, along with a short duration 10cm Radio Burst (TenFlare). A coronal mass ejection (CME) became visible in the latest LASCO C2 imagery. So far it appears to be headed mostly to the south and west. More to follow if necessary.

06/12/2014 @ 12:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday morning. Solar activity during the past 24 hours continued at moderate levels with four M-Class solar flares detected. Region 2087 was responsible for three of these, including an M3.9 at 21:03 UTC, M2.0 at 04:21 UTC and M2.7 at 10:21 UTC. Region 2085 produced the other M-Flare, an M1.8 event at 09:37 UTC. Additional M-Class solar flares will be possible today with regions 2080. 2085 and 2087 being the most likely source. An isolated X-Class event is also a possibility. New regions 2091 and 2092 were numbered overnight, but are not considered a threat for strong solar flares at this time. All other visible regions remain fairly stable for now. No large Earth directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were observed during the past 24 hours. Stay tuned for the latest information.

06/11/2014 @ 21:20 UTC Moderate Solar Flare Detected (M3.9)
Flaring continues on Wednesday evening with a moderate M3.9 solar flare around sunspot 2087 at 21:03 UTC. The event was associated with a short duration Radio Burst (TenFlare) measuring 420 solar flux units (SFU). Additional flaring is likely. More updates to follow regarding a possible CME. Stay tuned for the latest information.

06/11/2014 @ 12:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was high with three X-Flares, two M-Flares and several C-Class flares detected. Most of the activity was centered around magnetically unstable region 2087 which continues to rotate into a more geoeffective position in the southeast quadrant. Two X-Flares (X2.2 and X1.5) took place on Tuesday morning. The X1.5 event at 12:52 UTC / June 10 was responsible for a bright coronal mass ejection (CME) that was directed mostly to the east and away from our planet. Only a glancing blow to our geomagnetic field is expected by June 13. This morning, the active region (2087) produced a moderate M3.0 flare at 08:09 UTC, followed by an impulsive X1.0 event at 09:06 UTC. Both events appear to have generated faint coronal mass ejections that are not expected to impact our planet. Additional flaring will be possible around AR2087 during the next 24 hours. Region 2080 and 2085 located in the southwest quadrant remain large clusters and are capable of producing at least isolated M-Class solar flares. In the northwest, regions 2079 and 2082 showed new spot growth during the past 12 hours and should be monitored. Three new active regions (2088, 2089, 2090)were numbered overnight and appear to be stable at this time. Stay tuned for the latest information.

06/11/2014 @ 10:45 UTC Strong Solar Flare Detected (X1.0)
Region 2087 produced an impulsive X1.0 solar flare Wednesday morning at 09:06 UTC. This is now the 3rd such X-Class event within the past 24 hours. A relatively faint coronal mass ejection (CME) is seen in the latest LASCO C2 coronagraph imagery. The active region will continue to be a threat for major solar flares as it continues to rotate into a more geoeffective position. More to follow..

06/10/2014 @ 12:00 UTC Strong Solar Flare Detected (X2.2)
A strong, but impulsive solar flare measuring X2.2 was detected Tuesday morning around new sunspot 2087 at 11:42 UTC. The source sunspot is now just rotating into view off off the southeast limb. Any associated CME will likely be directed away from our planet. More updates to follow.

06/09/2014 @ 11:40 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Monday. X-Ray activity during the past 24 hours was low, although the chances for stronger flares should gradually increase. Sunspot 2085 is currently showing the most promise having increased in both size and magnetic complexity. A small delta configuration is present within the center of the group. All other regions, including sunspots 2080 and 2082 remain stable for the time being. An isolated M-Class solar flare will remain a possibility today. An impressive eruption off the east limb Sunday evening generated a non Earth directed coronal mass ejections (CME). The source may have been the result of activity near old region 2065, due to rotate back into view within the next 24 hours.

06/08/2014 @ 13:25 UTC Geomagnetic Storm in Progress
Surprise! A moderate geomagnetic storm is in progress. Increased solar wind speeds combining with periods of southward Bz is leading to the unexpected storm. Sky watchers at high latitudes should be alert for visible aurora if it remains dark outside.

ALERT: Geomagnetic K-index of 6
Threshold Reached: 2014 Jun 08 0900 UTC
Synoptic Period: 0600-0900 UTC
Active Warning: Yes
NOAA Scale: G2 - Moderate
Potential Impacts: Area of impact primarily poleward of 55 degrees Geomagnetic Latitude.
Induced Currents - Power grid fluctuations can occur. High-latitude power systems may experience voltage alarms.
Spacecraft - Satellite orientation irregularities may occur; increased drag on low Earth-orbit satellites is possible.
Radio - HF (high frequency) radio propagation can fade at higher latitudes.
Aurora - Aurora may be seen as low as New York to Wisconsin to Washington state.

06/07/2014 @ 10:40 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was moderate with a number of C-Class solar flares and one impulsive M-Flare detected. All of this activity was observed around region 2080, now approaching center disk. This region, along with sunspots 2082 and 2085, will remain a threat for isolated M-Class solar flares. There is also a slight chance for an isolated X-Class event. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours.

06/06/2014 @ 11:40 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity was low during the past 24 hours with only an insignificant C1.1 flare detected around region 2080. This region will remain a threat for additional C-Class solar flares today. Elsewhere, region 2082 in the northeast quadrant continues to gradually expand, but remains stable for the time being. All other regions, including new sunspot 2083 towards the southwest limb, remain quiet. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

06/04/2014 @ 11:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Solar activity declined to lower levels with only minor C-Class activity detected within the past 24 hours. Most of this minor flaring is being observed around region 2077, now located near center disk. All other visible regions, including newly numbered region 2081 remain quiet for the time being. There will remain a chance for C-Class solar flares. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

06/03/2014 @ 09:25 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was mostly at very low levels. Activity did climb to moderate levels thanks to an isolated M1.3 solar flare observed around region 2077 at 04:09 UTC. This region is currently the largest visible Earth facing sunspot group and is capable of producing at least C-Class solar flares. All other regions, including newly numbered region 2080 in the southeast quadrant, remain stable for now. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

06/01/2014 @ 14:10 UTC Solar Update
Good morning and welcome to the month of June. Here is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours continued at low levels. New sunspots 2078 and 2079 were numbered overnight. Solar activity is expected to continue at low levels with a slight chance for an isolated M-Class event. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.


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