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[SolarHam Sunspot Summary]
[SolarHam Farside Watch]
04/18/2014 @ 14:00 UTC Moderately Strong Solar Flare Detected (M7.3)
A moderately strong solar flare measuring M7.3 was observed around region 2036 on Friday morning peaking at 13:03 UTC. A 10cm Radio Burst (TenFlare) measuring 1000 sfu and lasting 24 minutes was associated with the event. The flare itself was long in duration and a halo coronal mass ejection (CME) is now visible in the latest STEREO Ahead COR2 imagery. There does appear to be an Earth directed component, but will need to be verified once Earth facing LASCO imagery is available. Imagery by SDO/EVE.

04/17/2014 @ 13:15 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity was moderate during the past 24 hours with a number of C-Class flares and one low level M-Flare detected. The largest X-Ray event was an M1.0 flare around region 2035 at 19:59 UTC Wednesday. The active region has been relatively stable ever since, but will remain a threat for an isolated M-Class flare event. Elsewhere, both regions 2034 and 2036 continued in a growth phase and will each remain a threat for an isolated M-Class event. Region 2037, the source of a C-Class flare at 11:55 UTC this morning, did show signs of decay within the trailing section of the group, but will also remain a threat for an isolated M-Flare. New region 2042, now fully in view off the northeast limb, is currently stable. All other visible Earth facing regions were quiet. Stay Tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

04/16/2014 @ 10:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attaced is an updated look at our peppered solar disk. Solar activity continues at relatively low levels with a number of mid to low level C-Class solar flares observed within the past 12 hours. They include a C4.5 around region 2034, a C5.2 around region 2035, a C3.0 around region 2037 and a C4.1 around a new active region now coming into view off the northeast limb. Despite continuing to increase in both size and magnetic complexity, sunspot 2036 is stable for the time being. Newly numbered regions 2039 and 2040 are struggling to remain visible and are not considered a large threat for solar flares at this time. There will remain a chance for C-Class flares on Wednesday with an isolated M-Class event possible as regions 2034, 2035, 2036 and 2037 sit in a geoeffective Earth facing position. Stay Tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

04/15/2014 @ 11:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was at low levels. Both regions 2035 and 2036 produced a number of C-Class flares, including a C8.6 around 2035 at 09:23 UTC. Each of the remaining visible regions remained stable. Sunspots 2036 and 2037 each continued to evolve in both size and magnetic complexity during the past 24 hours and are now in a good geoeffective position. Old region 2014, now fully in view off the southeast limb, was renumbered 2038 and appears to be stable. There will remain a chance for C-Class solar flares and perhaps an isolated M-Class event.Stay Tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

04/14/2014 @ 09:05 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity continues at low levels, although the frequency of C-Class flaring is on the rise. Sunspot 2036 produced an impulsive C7.5 flare at 04:38 UTC. At the time of that flare, a mid level C-Class flare was already in progress around a region now rotating into view off the southeast limb. That same limb region went on to produce another mid level C-Flare (C5.2) at 08:00 UTC.

Across the disk, region 2035 did show intermediate spot growth during the past 12 hours, but remained fairly stable. To the west, region 2036 continues to rapidly expand and is now a threat for an isolated M-Class flare event. Also in the southeast quadrant, region 2037 continues to slowly develop, but remains mostly stable for now. All other visible regions, including sunspot 2034, have been quiet.

Solar activity is expected to be at low levels with a chance for isolated M-Class solar flares on Monday.Stay Tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

04/13/2014 @ 13:35 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity remains at low levels. Region 2035 continues to evolve as it rotates into a more direct Earth view. The active region will remain a threat for an isolated M-Class event. All other visible regions, including newly numbered sunspot 2036 remain stable for now. Stay Tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

04/11/2014 @ 11:35 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity increased somewhat with a near M-Flare (C9.4) detected at 11:24 UTC around newly numbered region 2035 (ex-2010) now rotating into view off the east limb. We will get a better look at the active region within the next 24 hours. Isolated M-Class solar flares will be a possibility as we head into the weekend. All other visible regions, including new region 2034, remain fairly stable. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were observed during the past 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

04/10/2014 @ 13:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity is low this morning with low level C-Class flares being observed off the southeast limb. All currently numbered visible sunspot regions, including 2032 and 2033 remain stable. Regions 2029 and 2030 are now spotless. A new region rotated into view off the east limb this morning and should be numbered later today. There will remain a chance for at least C-Class solar flares today with an isolated M-Class event possible as a potential region behind the east limb approaches. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

04/09/2014 @ 14:10 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Earth facing activity crawls along at very low to low levels. New region 2032 was separated into two, with the trailing alpha magnetic spot being numbered 2033. All visible Earth facing regions remain stable. A farsided eruption near old region 2014 last night flung a full halo coronal mass ejection (CME) into space and away from our planet. That region is still about 5 days away from returning into view off the east limb.

04/08/2014 @ 12:55 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity remains at low levels. Some new spot development was observed within the lead section of region 2026, otherwise all other numbered regions remain stable. A cluster of spots rotated into view off the northeast limb and looks to be the return of old region 2005 from the previous rotation. So far the group appears to be stable. A prominence eruption last night off the southwest limb generated a coronal mass ejection (CME) that was directed to the west and away from Earth. There will remain a chance for at least C-Class solar flares during the next 24 hours.

04/07/2014 @ 12:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity was low during the past 24 hours with minor C-Class flares observed around regions 2026 and 2031. The largest x-ray event of the period was a C4.0 flare around region 2026 at 06:31 UTC Monday morning. All other regions are currently stable. Old region 2005 from the previous rotation is now rotating back into view off the east limb. There will remain a small chance for an isolated M-Class event today. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections (CME) were observed in LASCO coronagraph imagery during the past 24 hours.

04/04/2014 @ 10:45 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was at low levels. Both regions 2026 and 2030 have been producing C-Class solar flares. In the southwest quadrant, region 2021 is showing some new spot growth this morning, but remains quiet for the time being. In the southeast, minor spot development was observed within the central section of 2026. Elsewhere, region 2030 located in the northeast quadrant continues to gradually expand as it rotates into a more geoeffective position. All other regions remain stable. An isolated M-Class flare event will remain a possibility as we head into the weekend.

A minor geomagnetic storm watch is in effect for the next 24-48 hours when a pair of CMEs are expected to possibly merge and deliver at least a glancing blow to our geomagnetic field. Energetic proton levels as measured by the Electron, Proton, and Alpha-particle Monitor (EPAM) instrument on board the ACE Spacecraft have been gradually climbing over the past 10 hours. This indicates that a coronal mass ejection (CME) shock front is still in an approach phase.

04/03/2014 @ 13:40 UTC Solar Update
Solar activity during the past 24 hours reached high levels thanks to an M6.5 solar flare event around region 2027 at 14:05 UTC. The long duration event was associated with Type II and Type IV radio emissions, along with a 10cm radio burst lasting 26 minutes and measuring 3700 solar flux units (sfu). A bright, asymmetrical coronal mass ejection (CME) became visible soon after and was directed mostly away from Earth. In the southern hemisphere, region 2021 remains stable as it rotates into the southwest quadrant. Region 2026 located in the southeast quadrant seen some consolidation within the trailing section of the group and is currently stable. To the north, region 2029 continues to evolve and should continue to be monitored. Newly numbered region 2030 continues to gradually expand and is currently producing C-Class solar flares. A number of small pores have developed to the south of region 2027, however a noteworthy sunspot is not yet present. There will remain an ongoing threat for isolated M-Class flare events.

04/02/2014 @ 14:15 UTC Moderately Strong Solar Flare Detected (M6.5)
A rather noisy and long duration solar flare event measuring M6.5 was just observed around sunspot 2027 at 14:05 UTC. These types of flares are often associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Because the source region is located close to the northeast limb, a CME would likely be directed mostly away from our planet. More information to follow.

04/02/2014 @ 10:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning SolarHammers. Below is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low. A pair of C3-Class solar flares were observed this morning. The first at 06:06 UTC was centered around a new active region currently forming in close proximity to region 2027 in the northeast quadrant. The second was centered around region 2026 in the southeast quadrant at 06:25 UTC. Region 2021 located near center disk has been fairly quiet and did show some minor separation between the lead and trailing sections of the group. New sunspot 2029 located to the northwest of 2027 continues to gradually expand this morning and should be monitored. All other visible numbered regions remain stable. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class event during the next 24 hours.

Geomagnetic activity is currently at quiet levels. Forecasters were calling for the possibility of one, and perhaps even two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to brush past our planet, however as of this update, no incoming shocks have been detected.

04/01/2014 @ 09:55 UTC Solar Update
Good morning and welcome to the month of April. Solar activity declined to much lower levels as compared to the previous several days. Region 2014, the source of low level M-Class activity, rotated onto the west limb and out of direct Earth view. Region 2017, the source of a strong X1.0 solar flare on March 29th, continued to decay and is now for the most part spotless. Regions 2021 and 2026 both continued to expand, but have remained mostly stable up until this update. There will remain a chance for a moderate M-Class solar flare on Tuesday. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were observed during the past 24 hours.

03/31/2014 @ 11:15 UTC Solar Update
Good morning and welcome to the final day of March. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity was moderate during the past 24 hours with a pair of M-Class solar flares. The first event, an M2.1 flare around sunspot 2017 at 11:55 UTC (03/30), generated a non Earth directed coronal mass ejection (CME). The second event, associated with a Type IV radio emission, was an M1.4 eruption around departing sunspot 2014 at 08:07 UTC (03/31). Updated imagery by STEREO Ahead COR2 indicates a possible CME that is likely directed to the west and away from Earth. All other visible regions, including newly numbered regions 2026 and 2027 are currently stable. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class flare event within the next 24 hours.

03/30/2014 @ 13:40 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity reached high levels during the past 24 hours thanks to an X1.0 solar flare around region 2017. The event was associated with a 10cm Radio Burst (TenFlare) measuring 360 sfu, a Type II Radio Emission with an estimated velocity of 4508 km/s, and a coronal mass ejection (CME) that appears to be directed mostly north of the ecliptic. Region 2017 also produced a low level M-Flare on Sunday morning at approximately 11:55 UTC and was responsible for a Type II Radio Emission with an estimated velocity of 879 km/s. A CME is now becoming visible in the latest STEREO Ahead COR2 imagery. More information to follow regarding this event once additional imagery becomes available. The active region is showing signs of decay, however it remains magnetically complex and could produce additional isolated solar flares. All other visible numbered regions remain stable. A few low level C-Class flares were observed overnight around a new region now rotating into view off the southeast limb.

03/29/2014 @ 18:00 UTC Strong Solar Flare Detected (X1.0)
Strong solar flare detected! Sunspot 2017 located in the northwest quadrant produced an impulsive X1.0 solar flare peaking at 17:48 UTC. More information to follow regarding a possible coronal mass ejection (CME). Stay tuned.

03/29/2014 @ 10:40 UTC Solar Update
Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday morning. Solar activity was moderate during the past 24 hours with a pair of M2 solar flares detected around region 2017. Each event produced a coronal mass ejection (CME) with what appears to be non Earth directed trajectories. The active region has been fairly stable ever since. A filament eruption was observed near region 2014 this morning beginning at 06:20 UTC. A coronal mass ejection (CME) became visible in STEREO Ahead COR2 imagery and appears to be headed to the west. More updates to follow once Earth facing imagery becomes available. All other visible Earth facing regions remain fairly stable with only minor C-Class activity detected. New region 2023 was numbered overnight after forming in between regions 2010 and 2014 near the west limb. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class event.

03/29/2014 @ 01:20 UTC Moderate Solar Flare Detected (M2.6)
Solar activity is now at moderate levels thanks to a pair of M-Class solar flares centered around sunspot 2017. The first event, an M2.0 flare at 19:18 UTC Friday afternoon, was associated with a Type II radio emission with an estimated velocity of 528 km/s. A coronal mass ejection (CME) was produced and appears to be directed mostly to the north. The second event, an M2.6 flare at 23:51 UTC, was also resonsible for a Type II emission with an estimated velocity of 857 km/s. A second CME became visible in LASCO C2 imagery and so far appears to be directed mostly north of the ecliptic. More updates to follow if necessary.

03/28/2014 @ 11:40 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity was low during the past 24 hours with one C-Class flare detected. Region 2010, the source of that minor flare (C4.8) at 20:29 UTC, is approaching the west limb and will soon rotate out of direct Earth view. All other numbered regions remain stable. A new sunspot is forming today in the southeast quadrant and could be assigned a number later today. Elsewhere, a small sunspot rotated into view off the northeast limb, but does not appear to be a large threat for solar flares. Stay tuned to www.solarham.com for the latest information.

03/27/2014 @ 11:35 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attaced is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity is very low this morning with X-Ray levels below C1.0. New sunspot 2019 was numbered after forming in close proximity to 2010, but appears to be fading away. Another newly numbered region, sunspot 2020 in the southeast quadrant, is magnetically simple and is not considered a large threat for solar flares. Sunspot growth is being observed to the southeast of region 2014 this morning and could be assigned a sunspot number later today if it sticks around long enough. There will remain a chance for at least C-Class solar flares today.

03/26/2014 @ 13:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity remains low. Sunspots 2010 and 2014 are each showing signs of decay. Region 2018 in the northeast quadrant grew slightly overnight. All other visible regions remain stable. There will remain a chance for C-Class solar flares and a lower threat for an isolated M-Class event.

03/25/2014 @ 22:00 UTC CME Impact
Magnetometers situated on both the Earth orbiting GOES-13 satellite and the ground based instrument in Boulder, Colorado detected a geomagnetic sudden impulse just after 20:00 UTC. This signals the exact moment an interplanetary shock (IP Shock) swept past our planet. A minor increase in geomagnetic activity will be possible during the hours ahead. Sky watchers at high latitudes should remain alert. The plasma cloud (coronal mass ejection) was the result of a C5.0 eruption around sunspot 2014 on March 23rd.

SUMMARY: Geomagnetic Sudden Impulse
Observed: 2014 Mar 25 2009 UTC
Deviation: 23 nT
Station: HAD

03/25/2014 @ 10:40 UTC Solar Update
Good Tuesday morning to everybody. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk. Solar activity remains at low levels with only minor C-Class flares detected within the past 24 hours. Most of the minor activity is being observed around sunspot 2010 in the southern hemisphere. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class event around both regions 2010 and 2014. All other visible regions, including newly numbered sunspot 2018 remain stable for now.

Low energy proton levels streaming past Earth are slightly enhanced this morning, but remain well below the minor radiation storm threshold.

Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

03/24/2014 @ 12:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity declined to low levels. A number of minor C-Class flares were detected around sunspots 2010 (Beta-Gamma-Delta) and 2014 (Beta-Gamma). The other noteworthy visible regions, 2015 (Beta-Delta) and 2017 (Beta-Gamma) are currently stable. Elsewhere, Region 2011 rotated onto the west limb and out of direct Earth view. Regions 2008 and 2016 decayed and are now spotless. A new sunspot is forming to the south of region 2017 and could be assigned a number later today. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were detected during the past 24 hours. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class event, with sunspot 2010 being the most likely source. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

03/23/2014 @ 12:55 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity declined to lower levels with only C-Class X-Ray activity detected. Region 2014 produced a long duration C5.0 flare peaking at 03:48 UTC. The event generated a coronal mass ejection (CME) that became visible soon after in STEREO-B COR2 imagery. So far it looks to be headed mostly away from our planet with only a slight Earth directed component possible. Elsewhere, Regions 2010 (BGD), 2015 (BD) and 2017 (BG) each continued to expand in both size and magnetic complexity. There will remain a chance for isolated M-Class solar flares, with regions 2010 and 2014 being the most likely source. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

03/22/2014 @ 12:10 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity was moderate during the past 24 hours. Region 2011 produced an M1.1 solar flare peaking at 07:02 UTC and was in conjunction with an eruptive prominence near the west limb. A coronal mass ejection (CME) became visible in LASCO C2 imagery shortly after the flare and appears to be directed to the west. A filament eruption in the vicinity of region 2005 in the northwest quadrant registered as a long duration C-Class flare at approximately 09:05 UTC. A second CME became visible in STEREO Behind COR2 imagery and appears to be directed mostly to the north. More imagery is needed in order to provide better analysis. All other visible regions remain fairly stable for now. New sunspots 2015, 2016 and 2017 were numbered overnight. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

03/20/2014 @ 14:35 UTC Solar Update
Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity reached moderate levels thanks to a pair of solar flares in quick succession this morning. Region 2010 generated the first event beginning at approximately 03:30 UTC and looks to be the source of an easterly directed coronal mass ejection (CME) that became visible in LASCO C2 coronagraph imagery. This was followed up by a shorter duration event, an M1.7 solar flare peaking at 03:56 UTC around sunspot 2014. Region 2011 located in the southwest quadrant continued to show signs of growth, but has remained fairly quiet so far. All other regions appear to be stable. Region 2002 continued to decay as it rotated onto the west limb and out of direct Earth view. Additional isolated M-Class solar flares will be possible during the next 24 hours.

03/19/2014 @ 14:25 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity reached near moderate levels this morning. The most productive region, sunspot 2010, produced a number of C-Class solar flares, including a C9.9 flare at 07:34 UTC. The active region continues to evolve and could produce an isolated M-Class event during the next 24 hours. Old region 1997 from the previous rotation is now turning into view off the southeast limb and was responsible for a low level C-Flare this morning. Region 2002, now in an advanced state of decay, will begin to move onto the west limb later tonight. All other visible regions remain fairly stable for now. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

03/18/2014 @ 15:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity remains at low levels. Region 2002 continues to decay as it moves closer towards the west limb. Region 2004 gradually expanded in size, but remained quiet. Regions 2007, 2008 and 2009 each remain stable or in a state of decay. New region 2010 located in the southeast quadrant was numbered and appears to be in a growth phase. Lastly, old region 1986 rotated back into view off the northeast limb and is not considered a large threat for solar flares. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

03/15/2014 @ 12:50 UTC Solar Update
Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity is currently at low levels with minor C-Class activity observed during the past 24 hours. Most of the minor activity is being detected around sunspot 2003 as it moves closer towards the west limb. Both 2003 and region 2006 will begin to rotate onto the limb later today. All other visible regions, including 2002 in the southern hemisphere, remain fairly stable. Small new sunspot 2008 was numbered after rotating into view off the east limb. There will remain a chance for minor C-Class solar flares and perhaps a lower threat for an isolated M-Class event. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours.

03/14/2014 @ 13:10 UTC Solar Update
Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity declined to lower levels this morning with only C-Class flares observed. Most of the activity was detected around departed sunspot 1996 now located behind the west limb, including a C5.0 flare at 10:20 UTC. Region 2003 was the source of a minor C4.7 flare at 05:52 UTC. All other regions, including sunspot 2002 remained stable. A new region located to the north of 2003 formed quickly overnight and was numbered 2006. Elsewhere, a small sunspot trailing 2005 in the northeast quadrant was numbered 2007. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class flare as we head into the weekend.

A prominence eruption Friday morning off the east limb produced a coronal mass ejection (CME). Because of the event location, it appears to be directed away from our planet.

03/13/2014 @ 13:00 UTC Solar Update
Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity reached high levels. The strongest event during the past 24 hours was an impulsive M9.3 solar flare around sunspot 1996 at 22:34 UTC. The event did not generate a noteworthy CME. The active region continues to rotate behind the west limb and out of direct Earth view. All other visible regions, including sunspots 2002 and 2003 remain stable for now. A couple of small trailing spots behind region 2005 near the northeast limb are now coming into view but appear to be rather insignificant. There will remain a chance for an isolated moderate solar flare during the next 24 hours.

A brief period of minor G1 level geomagnetic storming was observed last night at high latitudes during a prolonged period of southward Bz. Conditions have since returned to more quieter levels.

Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

03/12/2014 @ 22:50 UTC Strong Solar Flare Detected (M9.3)
Departing sunspot 1996 produced an impulsive M9.3 solar flare peaking at 22:34 UTC. Rapid releases of energy are not generally known to produce large coronal mass ejections, but we will wait for updated coronagraph imagery to confirm if a plasma cloud is associated. If there is, it would likely be directed mostly away from our planet. Imagery by SDO/EVE.

03/12/2014 @ 11:20 UTC Moderate Solar Flare Detected (M2.5)
Sunspot 1996 just produced an M2.5 solar flare peaking at 11:05 UTC. The active region continues to rotate closer towards the west limb and will soon begin to rotate out of direct Earth view. Future eruptions around this region will likely be directed away from our planet. Imagery by SDO/EVE.

03/11/2014 @ 10:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity remained at moderate levels during the past 24 hours thanks to a pair of M-Class flares observed around sunspot 1996, and one low level M-Class flare detected around sunspot 2002. The largest of these events was an M3.5 flare at 03:50 UTC centered around region 1996. A noteworthy coronal mass ejection (CME) was not associated with this event when viewing the latest LASCO imagery. Region 1996 continues to rotate closer toward the west limb and is no longer in a good geoeffective position. Region 2002 on the other hand is now moving into a better Earth directed position. Each region will remain a threat for M-Class solar flares today. All other visible regions are currently stable. A potential active region located beyond the northeast limb, the source of a strong farsided flare on March 5th, will begin to rotate into view during the next 24-48 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

03/11/2014 @ 04:10 UTC Moderate Solar Flare Detected (M3.5)
Sunspot 1996 produced another moderate solar flare, this time an M3.5 event at 03:50 UTC early Tuesday morning. The active region continues to rotate closer towards the west limb. Any future eruptions around this region will be directed mostly away from our planet. Imagery by SDO/EVE.

03/10/2014 @ 11:30 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity continues at moderate levels. Region 2002 located in the southeast quadrant continued to produce low level M-Flares and a number of minor C-Class flares. The active region continues to maintain a weak delta magnetic signature within the central portion of the group and could produce additional moderate flare activity. In the northern hemisphere, sunspot 1996 remains the other sunspot of interest and is currently producing minor C-Class flares. New sunspots 2003 and 2004 were numbered overnight and are not considered a major threat for solar flares at this time. All other visible regions remain stable or in a state of decay. A couple of coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours and each appear to be directed away from Earth. One of these events was the result of a solar flare around old region 1986 currently transiting the farside of the sun. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

03/09/2014 @ 16:55 UTC Solar Update
Good afternoon. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity reached moderate levels during the past 24 hours with two M-Class flares and a number of C-Class flares detected. Region 2002 located in the southeast quadrant was the source of an M1.4 event at 23:41 UTC and an M1.0 flare at 13:58 UTC this morning. The active region continues to expand in both size and magnetic complexity as it rotates into a more geoeffective position. Region 1996 in the northern hemisphere expanded overnight ans is currently producing C-Class solar flares. All other visible regions remain stable. Long lasting sunspot 1990 rotated off the visible disk and behind the west limb. There will remain a chance for isolated M-Class solar flares. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

03/08/2014 @ 13:55 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity was low during the past 24 hours with only minor C-Class activity detected. New sunspot 2002 was numbered after rotating into view off the east limb. It produced a minor C3.4 solar flare at 00:07 UTC. Region 1990 (ex-1967, 1944) continues to move closer to the west limb and will soon rotate out of direct Earth view. All other visible regions are either stable or in a state of decay. There will remain a chance for isolated C-Class flares this weekend. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

03/07/2014 @ 13:10 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Friday. Earth facing solar activity continues at very low levels. Region 1991 continues to decay as it moves across the southwest quadrant. Regions 1995, 1996 and 2000 each showed minor spot growth during the past 12 hours. All other regions remain stable for now. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours. There will remain a chance for isolated C-Class solar flares as we head into the weekend. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

03/06/2014 @ 11:05 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity on the Earth facing side of the sun is currently at very low levels. Region 1991 continues to decay as it transits the southern hemisphere and is no longer considered a major threat for stronger solar flares. All other visible regions regions remain stable or in a state of decay. New regions 2000 and 2001 were numbered overnight, however both appear to be insignificant at this time. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours.

03/05/2014 @ 13:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity was moderate during the past 24 hours with a number of C-Class flares and one low level M-Class solar flare detected. Sunspot 1991, the source of an impulsive M1.0 flare at 02:10 UTC, is showing signs of decay, but still hangs on to a weak delta configuration. Additional minor to moderate solar flares will remain possible around 1991 during the next 24 hours. A small new sunspot formed quickly on Tuesday and was numbered 1997. This sunspot, along with regions 1987, 1989 and 1994 are all about to rotate onto the west limb and will soon be out of direct Earth view. Old region 1974 from the previous rotation rotated back into view off the east limb and was renumbered 1998. The former active region appears to be in an advanced state of decay and is not considered a major flare threat at this time. A small new sunspot located in the southeast quadrant formed overnight and may be assigned number 1999 later today. All other visible regions are currently stable. Stay Tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

03/04/2014 @ 11:55 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity is currently at low levels. A number of mid to upper level C-Class solar flares were detected within the past 12 hours. Sunspot 1991 produced a number of these flares including a C8.3 at 04:55 UTC and C4.4 at 10:24 UTC. Region 1986, now located beyond the northwest limb, also produced a number of C-Flares, including a C7.6 at 11:24 UTC. All other visible regions remain fairly stable for now. Old region 1974 from the previous rotation is located just beyond the east limb and will soon begin to rotate back into Earth view. There will remain a chance for isolated M-Class solar flares during the next 24 hours.

03/03/2014 @ 12:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity reached moderate levels thanks to an isolated M1 solar flare around plage region 1986 located near the northwest limb. A number of minor C-Class flares were also observed around regions 1989 and 1991. Sunspot 1989 was initially spotless, however did show regrowth during the past 24 hours. Elsewhere, Sunspot 1991 is currently the largest Earth facing region and will remain a threat for an isolated M-Class event. All other visible regions remain stable for now. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections (CME) were detected during the past 24 hours.

Low energy proton levels streaming past Earth continue to gradually decline and are now below the minor S1 radiation storm threshold.

03/02/2014 @ 15:20 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity is currently at low levels. Minor C-Class flares are being observed around departed region 1982, now located behind the west limb and out of direct Earth view. All other visible regions remain stable at this time. Sunspot 1991 did show intermediate spot growth during the past 12 hours and should be monitored. New region 1996 was numbered and continues to evolve in the northeast quadrant. There will remain a chance for at least C-Class solar flares today.

02/28/2014 @ 12:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning and welcome to the final day of February. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity was at moderate levels during the past 24 hours. Sunspot 1991 produced the strongest event of the period, an impulsive M1.1 solar flare at 00:48 UTC. Elsewhere, Sunspot 1982, now approaching the west limb, produced a few C-Class flares, including a C8.1 at 10:06 UTC. Both regions 1982 and 1984 are about to rotate onto the west limb and will soon be out of direct Earth view. All other visible regions, including sunspot 1990, remain stable for now. New regions 1994 and 1995 were numbered overnight. There will remain a chance for isolated M-Class solar flares.

A period of moderate G2 level geomagnetic storming (KP=6) was observed Thursday evening when a coronal mass ejection (CME) impacted our geomagnetic field. A prolonged period of southward Bz helped to intensify activity and led to vivid aurora displays across northern Europe and Scandinavia. The timing of the impact did not bode well for sky watchers in North America. Storming has since subsided, although flareups of geomagnetic activity will be possible in the wake of the CME impact.

Proton levels streaming past Earth remain at higher levels. The moderate S2 radiation storm threshold (Proton Event 10MeV Integral Flux exceeded 100pfu) was briefly reached Friday morning. A minor S1 radiation storm remains in progress.

02/28/2014 @ 03:00 UTC Geomagnetic Storm in Progress
A geomagnetic sudden impulse measuring 22 nT was detected at 16:53 UTC by ground based magnetometers. This signals the moment an expected plasma cloud (CME) swept past our planet. Solar wind speeds increased to above 430 km/s and the Bz/IMF component is currently variable. A noteworthy rise in plasma density was also observed. Minor (G1) Geomagnetic Storming is being observed at high latitudes. Sky watchers should remain alert for visual aurora tonight at high latitudes.

Update: The Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is now pointed sharply south (-18 nT). This could help intensity geomagnetic activity in the wake of the earlier CME impact. The solar wind speed remains near 450 km/s.

ALERT: Geomagnetic K-index of 5
Threshold Reached: 2014 Feb 27 1928 UTC
Synoptic Period: 1800-2100 UTC
Active Warning: Yes
NOAA Scale: G1 - Minor
Potential Impacts: Area of impact primarily poleward of 60 degrees Geomagnetic Latitude.
Induced Currents - Weak power grid fluctuations can occur.
Spacecraft - Minor impact on satellite operations possible.
Aurora - Aurora may be visible at high latitudes, i.e., northern tier of the U.S. such as northern Michigan and Maine.

02/27/2014 @ 17:00 UTC CME Impact
A geomagnetic sudden impulse measuring 22 nT was detected at 16:53 UTC by ground based magnetometers. This signals the moment an expected plasma cloud (CME) swept past our planet. Solar wind speeds increased to above 430 km/s and the Bz/IMF component is currently variable. A noteworthy rise in plasma density was also observed. Increased geomagnetic activity will be possible during the hours ahead. Stay tuned for updates.

SUMMARY: Geomagnetic Sudden Impulse
Observed: 2014 Feb 27 1653 UTC
Deviation: 22 nT
Station: HAD

02/26/2014 @ 14:10 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity declined to low levels with C-Class flares observed around a variety of regions. A swath of sunspots consisting of regions 1981, 1982 and 1984 have each produced low level C-Class flares as they continue to rotate closer towards the west limb. An isolated M-Class flare will remain a small possibility, especially in the vicinity of 1981-1982. In the northern hemisphere, sunspot 1986 showed new spot growth within the trailing section of the group and could produce C-Class solar flares. New spot growth is also being observed this morning within the remnants of old region 1968 located towards the northeast limb. In the southeast quadrant, sunspot 1990, the source of the X4.9 event on Feb. 25, was upgraded to Beta-Delta status as it continues to rotate into a more direct Earth view. The long lasting active region will remain a threat for an isolated M-Class event. To the south, new region 1991 was numbered after rotating into view off the east limb and appears to be in a growth phase. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past 24 hours.

Proton levels streaming past Earth remain at higher levels on Wednesday following the X4.9 flare event that took place early on Feb. 25. A minor S1 level radiation storm remains in progress.

02/25/2014 @ 12:20 UTC Solar Update
Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity reached high levels with an X4.9 flare event observed around sunspot 1990 at 00:49 UTC. The blast was associated with Type II (estimated velocity 1972 km/s) and Type IV radio emissions, along with a 10cm Radio Burst (TenFlare) measuring 3700 sfu and lasting 85 minutes. A coronal mass ejection (CME) became visible soon after in coronagraph imagery and shows potential for a minor Earth directed component. A glancing blow impact to our geomagnetic field will be possible by midweek. All other visible regions remain stable. There will continue to be a chance for isolated solar flares above M1.0. Proton levels streaming past Earth in the wake of the X4.9 event continue to gradually rise. A minor (S1) radiation storm will be a possibility today.

02/25/2014 @ 01:00 UTC Major Solar Flare Detected (X4.9)
A major solar flare measuring X4.9 was just observed around returning sunspot 1967 at 00:49 UTC. This just proves you cannot judge a book by its cover. Despite appearing to be in a state of decay, the active region remains magnetically potent. The flare itself appears to be fairly impulsive. More updates to follow regarding a possible coronal mass ejection. The sunspot is not yet in a good position for Earth directed eruptions. More updates to follow.

02/24/2014 @ 11:30 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity initially declined to low levels with C-Class flares detected within the past 24 hours. Activity again reached moderate levels due to a low level M-Flare (M1.2) at 11:17 UTC Monday morning. Most flare activity, including the M1.2 flare, is being centered around former region 1967 which is now returning into view off the east limb. A dark core belonging to the long lasting active region is now visible in the latest imagery. It appears that 1967 is in an advanced state of decay and may no longer be a large threat for strong X-Class solar flares. We will have a better look at the entire region within the next 24 hours. Elsewhere, sunspot duo 1981-1982 remains stable as it transits the center of the visible disk. All other regions, including region 1987, remain quiet. There will continue to be a chance for an isolated M-Class event with regions 1981-1982 and returning region 1967 being the likely source.

02/23/2014 @ 10:15 UTC Solar Update
Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity is moderate thanks to an M1.1 solar flare around approaching region 1967 located off the southeast limb. We will begin to see the returning sunspot within the next 24 hours. Sunspots 1981 and 1982 located near center disk remain relatively quiet. This cluster of sunspots will remain a threat for an isolated M-Class solar flare. All other visible regions, including sunspot 1987 are currently stable. New sunspot 1989 was numbered overnight after rotating into view off the east limb. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

02/22/2014 @ 13:15 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity on the Earth facing side of the sun is currently at low levels. Sunspot 1982 remains the largest threat today for an isolated M-Class event. New spot growth was observed in between 1981 and 1982 during the past 24 hours. All other visible regions, including new sunspot 1987, remain stable. Old regions 1967 and 1968 are set to return back into view off the east limb during the next 24 hours. An increase in X-Ray activity is possible, particularly in response to 1967 which remained active while on the farside of the sun. A prominence eruption off the southwest limb was observed this morning and a coronal mass ejection (CME) is now visible in the latest LASCO coronagraph imagery. It appears to be directed too far south of the ecliptic to be geoeffective. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

02/21/2014 @ 12:05 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Friday. Solar activity declined to low levels with only minor C-Class flares detected. Sunspot 1976, the source of an M3.0 solar flare on Thursday, is now located behind the west limb. Sunspot 1982 in the southeast quadrant is currently the largest threat for an isolated M-Class event (40%). All other visible regions remain stable. A small new sunspot is rotating into view off the east limb and should be assigned a number later today.

The solar wind stream is currently just above 500 km/s and the Bz/IMF component is stable at -2 nT. At least one more minor shock passage is still expected within the next couple of days and could lead to minor geomagnetic activity.

02/20/2014 @ 10:30 UTC Moderate Solar Flare Detected (M3.0)
Sunspot 1976 surprised everybody this morning and produced a moderate M3.0 solar flare at 07:56 UTC. The event was associated with a Type II radio emission with an estimated velocity of 844 km/s, and a short duration 10cm Radio Burst (TenFlare) measuring 280sfu. A coronal mass ejection (CME) became visible following the event and is directed mostly to the west, but may have an Earth directed component. Low energy proton levels streaming past Earth are now above the minor S1 radiation storm threshold. It should be noted that an earlier eruption on the opposite side of the visible disk around regions 1981 and 1982 also produced a CME with a potential Earth directed component. More updates to follow. Imagery by SDO and LASCO C2.

02/20/2014 @ 05:15 UTC Geomagnetic Storm in Progress
Here we go again. An interplanetary shockwave was observed sweeping past the ACE spacecraft on Wednesday evening at 02:55 UTC. The solar wind speed is currently reaching above 700 km/s at times. The Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is pointing south (-10 nT). A geomagnetic sudden impulse measuring 31 nT was detected by the magnetometer located in Boulder, Colorado at 03:29 UTC. The signals the passage of an earlier than expected interplanetary shock past our planet. Sky watchers at high latitudes should remain alert for visual aurora. A minor G1 level geomagnetic storm is currently in progress with moderate G2 storming possible. Stay Tuned for updates.

ALERT: Geomagnetic K-index of 5
Threshold Reached: 2014 Feb 20 0438 UTC
Synoptic Period: 0300-0600 UTC
Active Warning: Yes
NOAA Scale: G1 - Minor
Potential Impacts: Area of impact primarily poleward of 60 degrees Geomagnetic Latitude.
Induced Currents - Weak power grid fluctuations can occur.
Spacecraft - Minor impact on satellite operations possible.
Aurora - Aurora may be visible at high latitudes, i.e., northern tier of the U.S. such as northern Michigan and Maine.

02/19/2014 @ 12:05 UTC Solar Update
Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity is currently at low levels with C-Class flares being detected. Sunspot 1974 is now located behind the west limb and out of direct Earth view. Of all the current visible regions, sunspot 1982 in the southeast quadrant will be the largest threat (15%) for an isolated M-Class flare. A new region is rotating into view off the northeast limb and is currently producing low level C-Class activity. All other visible regions remain stable.

A pair of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were observed during the past 12 hours. The first at 00:00 UTC appears to have originated in the northeast quadrant and was the result of a filament channel eruption. It so far appears to be directed mostly north of the sun-Earth ecliptic plane. The second, appears to be farsided and is awaiting further analysis.

The Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) tipped south on Tuesday evening (-7 nT) for a long duration, a condition that is known to stir up geomagnetic actiivty. An unexpected CME shock passage (SWS near 500 km/s, Bz tipped south -14 nT) was also detected by the ACE spacecraft at 03:10 UTC. Moderate G2 Level Geomagnetic Storm (KP=6) resulted at high latitudes. Visual aurora displays were reported across many locations, including the northern tier United States and Canada.

The solar wind speed is currently near 500 km/s on Wednesday morning. The Bz component of the IMF is variable with rotating periods of north and south pointing values. Enhanced geomagnetic activity reaching as high as storm levels will remain a possibility.

02/19/2014 @ 02:15 UTC Geomagnetic Storm in Progress
The Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is currently tipped south (-8 nT), a condition that is known to stir up geomagnetic actiivty. It has been in this state now for several hours. Sky watchers at high latitudes should be alert tonight for visual aurora if the Bz remains in this state. Geomagnetic activity reaching the minor G1 geomagnetic storm threshold is being observed.

ALERT: Geomagnetic K-index of 5
Threshold Reached: 2014 Feb 19 0155 UTC
Synoptic Period: 0000-0300 UTC
Active Warning: Yes
NOAA Scale: G1 - Minor
Potential Impacts: Area of impact primarily poleward of 60 degrees Geomagnetic Latitude.
Induced Currents - Weak power grid fluctuations can occur.
Spacecraft - Minor impact on satellite operations possible.
Aurora - Aurora may be visible at high latitudes, i.e., northern tier of the U.S. such as northern Michigan and Maine.

02/18/2014 @ 14:50 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity is currently at low levels. The largest X-Ray event during the past 24 hours was a minor C4.7 flare around sunspot 1976 at 01:33 UTC. Sunspot 1974, previously an active flare threat, is now rotating onto the west limb and will soon be out of direct Earth view. In the southeast quadrant, new sunspots 1981, 1982 and 1983 each appear to be in a growth phase as they continue to rotate into a more direct Earth view. All other visible regions are stable this morning. A potential new active region will begin to rotate into view off the northeast limb within the next 24 hours. There will continue to be a chance for an isolated M-Class event. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

02/18/2014 @ 03:15 UTC CME Impact
Attached image by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captures a filament eruption in the southern hemisphere on Monday evening. A coronal mass ejection (CME) became visible in the latest LASCO C2 imagery. A majority of the plasma appears to be directed to the south and east, however there does appear to be a weaker Earth directed component. More details to follow once a tracking model becomes available.

02/17/2014 @ 13:00 UTC Solar Update
Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity is currently at low levels with C-Class flares being observed around sunspot group 1977 and a new region now coming into view off the southeast limb. Sunspot 1977 is currently in a geoeffective position and is considered a threat for additional C-Class solar flares. There is also a lower chance for an isolated M-Class event around this region. Formerly threatening region 1974 will remain in view for another 24 hours before rotating onto the west limb. It still has the potential to produce an isolated M-Class event, however any eruptions at this point would likely be directed away from our planet. A new active region is rotating into view off the southeast limb and should be numbered later today. It is currently producing C-Class flares. All other visible regions remain stable. A coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with a prominence eruption was observed off the west limb early Monday morning. The plasma cloud was directed away from our planet and should have no impact on our geomagnetic field.

02/15/2014 @ 14:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity declined to low levels with only C-Class solar flares detected this morning. Sunspot 1974 will remain a threat for isolated M-Class solar flares as it continues to rotate closer towards the west limb. All other visible regions remain stable. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

02/15/2014 @ 13:50 UTC CME Impact
Good morning. The ACE spacecraft is showing a sudden solar wind increase to near 500 km/s. This signals the passage of at least one expected coronal mass ejection past the spacecraft. The plasma cloud is expected to sweep past Earth within the next hour or so. The attached EPAM Proton level data courtesy of the ACE spacecraft is showing a sudden spike which confirms an approaching CME shock front. More to follow.

UPDATE: Magnetometers around the globe detected a geomagnetic sudden impulse at approximately 13:20 UTC. This signals the passage of a CME past our planet. Increased geomagnetic activity will be possible in the hours ahead.

02/13/2014 @ 10:45 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity remains at moderate levels with a number of low level M-Flares detected around sunspot 1974. They include an M1.8 at 01:40 UTC, M1.0 at 02:51 UTC, M1.7 at 06:07 UTC and finally an M1 at 08:11 UTC. The geoeffective active region continues to maintain a complex Beta-Gamma-Delta magnetic configuration and may continue to produce M-Class solar flares during the next 24 hours. There is also a lower chance for an isolated X-Class event. All other visible Earth facing regions remain stable. Stay Tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

02/12/2014 @ 12:05 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday morning. Solar activity was moderate during the past 24 hours with three M-Class flares detected, an M1.8 at 16:51 UTC, M3.7 at 04:25 UTC and M2.3 at 06:58 UTC. Each of these events were centered around sunspot 1974 now located at center disk. A pair of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) became visible in both LASCO and STEREO imagery on Wednesday morning. The first was the result of farsided activity and directed to the west and away from Earth. The second plasma cloud appeared between the M3.7 and M2.3 events and may have a weak Earth directed component. All other visible regions remain stable. There will remain a chance for isolated M-Class solar flares around sunspot 1974 during the next 24 hours. Stay Tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

02/12/2014 @ 04:40 UTC Moderate Solar Flare Detected (M3.7)
Geoeffective sunspot cluster 1974 just produced a moderate M3.7 solar flare peaking at 04:25 UTC. The active region is now in a perfect position for Earth directed eruptions. More updates to follow if a coronal mass ejection (CME) happens to be associated with this event. Imagery by SDO/EVE.

02/11/2014 @ 11:55 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity reached moderate levels during the past 24 hours. Sunspot 1974 produced the strongest event, an M1.7 solar flare at 03:31 UTC. Associated with this event, were Type II and Type IV radio emissions. The active region expanded in both size and magnetic complexity and will remain a threat for another isolated M-Class event as it rotates into a geoeffective position. All other visible regions appear to be stable at this time. New region 1978 was numbered after forming in the northwest quadrant. A coronal mass ejection (CME) is visible this morning in the latest STEREO Ahead COR2 imagery. Further analysis is required, but so far appears to be directed away from Earth. Stay Tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

02/10/2014 @ 13:00 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity is currently at low levels with minor C-Class flares being detected. Sunspots 1967 and 1968 are now both located behind the west limb and out of direct Earth view. Of all the current visible numbered regions, sunspot 1974 showed the most growth during the past 24 hours. The active region will remain a threat for at least C-Class solar flares. All other visible regions, including 1976, remain stable for now. The source of an eruption behind the southeast limb yesterday is now beginning to rotate into view. We will get a better look at it during the next 24 hours. Stay Tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

02/09/2014 @ 16:20 UTC Solar Flare Detected (M1.0)
An eruption measuring just above the M1.0 level was just observed beginning at 16:00 UTC. Attached imagery below by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured the eruption which was centered just beyond the east limb. A coronal mass ejection (CME) is now becoming visible in the latest LASCO C2 imagery, but will likely be directed away from Earth due to the non geoeffective position. More updates to follow if necessary.

02/09/2014 @ 13:55 UTC Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated image of the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity is currently at low levels. Sunspots 1967 and 1968 are now rotating onto the west limb and will soon be out of direct Earth view. Both regions remained in a state of decay during the past 12 hours. All other visible regions, including sunspot 1976 now in view off the southeast limb, remain stable. There will continue to be a chance for C-Class solar flares and perhaps an isolated M-Class event during the next 24 hours.

Geomagnetic activity declined to quieter levels on Sunday morning after reaching the minor G1 geomagnetic storm threshold yesterday evening for a brief period. The solar wind speed is currently stable near 415 km/s and the Bz/IMF component is pointed slightly south (-4 nT). Sky watchers at very high latitudes should remain alert for visual aurora during the next 24 hours in case there are minor flareups of geomagnetic activity.

02/09/2014 @ 02:00 UTC Geomagnetic Storm in Progress
Minor G1 level geomagnetic storming is being observed Saturday evening. Sky watchers at high latitudes should remain alert tonight for visible aurora.

ALERT: Geomagnetic K-index of 5
Threshold Reached: 2014 Feb 08 2335 UTC
Synoptic Period: 2100-2400 UTC
Active Warning: Yes
NOAA Scale: G1 - Minor
Potential Impacts: Area of impact primarily poleward of 60 degrees Geomagnetic Latitude.
Induced Currents - Weak power grid fluctuations can occur.
Spacecraft - Minor impact on satellite operations possible.
Aurora - Aurora may be visible at high latitudes, i.e., northern tier of the U.S. such as northern Michigan and Maine.


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