SolarHam.com - Older News Archive (November 2014)

November 24, 2014 @ 16:00 UTC
Solar Update
Good morning. Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity continued at low levels with only minor C-Flares detected. Both regions 2209 and 2216 showed minor decay during the past day. Region 2217 located in the southeast quadrant expanded somewhat and should continue to be monitored. Newly assigned region 2218 was numbered after turning into view off the northeast limb and appears stable. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Flare during the next 24-48 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

November 23, 2014 @ 13:00 UTC
Solar Update
Good morning. Here is a look at the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low with minor C-Flares observed around regions 2209, 2216 and newly numbered region 2217. New spot growth was observed to the south of region 2209, and although appearing to be independent, is being considered part of the overall reach of 2209 for now. New sunspot 2217 was numbered after turning into view off the southeast limb and does not look too threatening at this time. An isolated M-Flare will remain possible as we close out the weekend. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

November 22, 2014 @ 12:05 UTC
Solar Update
Welcome to the weekend folks. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low with a number of minor C-Flares observed, most of which were centered around region 2209. The largest of these was a C8.1 at 01:01 UTC. An isolated M-Flare will remain possible this weekend with region 2209 being the most likely candidate to produce such an event. A coronal mass ejection (CME) was observed off the northeast limb and was directed away from our planet. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

November 20, 2014 @ 12:05 UTC
Solar Update / New Region 2216
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity increased somewhat, but remained below the moderate threshold. New region 2216 was numbered overnight after turning into view off the east limb. This looks to be the return of old region 2197 from the previous rotation. The active region produced a minor C7.6 flare at 06:41 UTC Thursday morning. Although still close to the limb for proper observation, there appears to be a small delta within the trailing section of the group. We will get a better look as the day progresses. All other regions, including region 2209 were fairly stable. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class flare event. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

November 18, 2014 @ 13:30 UTC
Weekend Aurora Show
This past weekend, lovely displays of aurora were visible all around the Arctic Circle and beyond due to an enhancement in geomagnetic activity. Marketa Murray captured the great photo below form Anchorage, Alaska and wanted to share with the SolarHam viewers. She says that video footage of the event will be available soon. More great imagery from others is listed below.

Additional imagery by: Chris Ratzlaff and Zoltan Kenwell in Alberta, Canada, Nicolas Doak in New Hampshire, Tracey Hays in Minnesota and Frédéric Péron, Gino Audet and Gilles Boutin in Québec, Canada.

November 19, 2014 @ 13:20 UTC
Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Wednesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low. The two lone remaining numbered regions (2209 and 2214) appear stable. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the past day. A sunspot located off the southeast limb is now just beginning to turn into view. This may be the return of old region 2197 which had been redeveloping on November 5th before rotating onto the west limb. We will get a better look at it during the next few days. There will remain a chance for C-Class solar flares and perhaps an isolated M-Class event. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

November 18, 2014 @ 12:00 UTC
Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity is at very low to low levels. No noteworthy solar flares were detected during the past day. New region 2215 was numbered after forming in the northeast quadrant, but is struggling to remain visible. There will remain an ongoing chance for an isolated M-Flare around region 2209 as it turns into a geoeffective position. A prominence eruption in the northeast quadrant produced a non Earth directed coronal mass ejection on Tuesday morning. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

November 17, 2014 @ 12:10 UTC
Solar Update
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Monday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was high. Region 2209 was reponsible for the largest X-Ray event, an M5.7 solar flare peaking at 17:48 UTC on Sunday. The event did not generate a noteworthy CME. The active region has been fairly stable ever since. All other visible numbered regions are quiet this morning. New region 2214 continues to form in the southeast quadrant, but is not yet considered a threat for strong solar flares. Elsewhere, a minor C6.5 flare was observed at 09:07 UTC this morning off the NW Limb. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Flare during the next 24 hours. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

November 16, 2014 @ 18:50 UTC
M5.7 Solar Flare Detected
Region 2209 produced another M-Flare, this time a moderately strong M5.7 event peaking at 17:48 UTC Sunday. The event was responsible for a brief R2 radio blackout, along with a 10cm radio burst (TenFlare) lasting 1 minute and measuring 300 solar flux units (SFU). So far it does not appear likely that a noteworthy CME was associated. More to follow if necessary. Click HERE for a video.

November 16, 2014 @ 03:35 UTC
Aurora Watch
A minor geomagnetic storm watch is currently in effect. Sky watchers at high latitudes should be alert tonight for visible aurora displays. The cause of the latest geomagnetic disturbance is due to what is known as a Co-Rotating Intersection Region (CIR). When fast solar-wind streams, emanating from coronal holes, interact with slow streams, they can produce Co-rotating Interaction Regions in interplanetary space. The magnetic fields of the slow streams in the solar wind are more curved due to the lower speeds, and the fields of the fast streams are more radial because of their higher speeds. Intense magnetic fields can be produced at the interface (IF) between the fast and slow streams in the solar wind. The Co-rotating Interaction Regions are bounded by a forward shock (FS) and a reverse shock (RS). More Info.

November 15, 2014 @ 21:00 UTC
More Flaring
Another moderate flare detected around old region 2192. Now renumbered 2209, the active region produced an impulsive M3.7 solar flare peaking at 20:46 UTC. A faint CME was produced and appears to be directed away from Earth. Image below by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) using the 94 angstroms channel.

November 15, 2014 @ 14:30 UTC
M3.2 Solar Flare / Aurora Watch
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity reached moderate levels. Region 2209 (ex-2192) let us know that it is still kicking with an M3.2 solar flare peaking at 12:03 UTC. The event was responsible for 10cm Radio Burst (TenFlare) lasting 8 minutes and measuring 229 solar flux units (SFU). Although coronagraph imagery is not yet updated, a noteworthy coronal mass ejection (CME) does not appear likely. The active region will remain a threat for at least M-Class solar flares. New sunspot 2213 was numbered overnight after forming in the southeast quadrant. It does not appear to be a major threat at this time. All other numbered regions were either stable or in a state of decay.

An elevated solar wind stream is expected to increase geomagnetic activity during the next 24-48 hours. Isolated minor (G1) storm conditions may be possible a high latitudes. Sky watchers should remain alert for visible aurora.

November 13, 2014 @ 11:25 UTC
Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Thursday. Solar activity remains at low levels. C-Flares have been observed around regions 2205, 2208 and 2209. Region 2209, the return of old sunspot 2192, produced a C8.4 peaking at 06:09 UTC. The former giant looks to have decayed significantly while transiting the farside of the sun. We will get a better look at what remains of the region as the day progresses. New sunspots 2210 and 2211 were numbered overnight and both appear to be magnetically simple. There will remain a chance for an isolated M-Class event. No Earth directed coronal mass ejections were detected during the past day. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

November 12, 2014 @ 18:15 UTC
Region 2192 Update
Old region 2192, or at least what is left of it, continues to move into view off the east limb. So far, only one small sunspot, and a large amount of facula is visible. Faculae is the term used to describe an area of the photosphere where concentrated magnetic fields are present and appear as a bright feature when viewed in white light. Facula is sometimes visible during sunspot formation, or in this case, when a sunspot region is in an advanced state of decay. We will know more within the next 24 hours if any other sunspots are visible. So far the region appears stable.

November 11, 2014 @ 05:15 UTC
Sunspot 2192 Lurking
Our old friend AR 2192, the largest visible sunspot in over 20 years, is lurking behind the east limb and is making its presence known. An eruption of plasma, presumably centered around whatever remains of the active region, is visible off the limb in the latest imagery courtesy of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We should see the long lasting region begin to reappear during the next 48 hours.

November 10, 2014 @ 14:30 UTC
CME Impact / Geomagnetic Storm Observed
The coronal mass ejection (CME) observed on November 7th reached Earth with a relatively gentle impact overnight. Solar wind speeds reached above 500 km/s and the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) has been mostly variable. Minor (G1) geomagnetic storm conditions were observed at high latitudes. Sky watchers, especially around the Arctic Cirlce should be alert for visible aurora displays once it is dark outside.

Aurora From Fairbanks, Alaska - By Marketa Murray

November 11, 2014 @ 12:50 UTC
Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low. Region 2205 continued to produce minor C-Flares, including a C6.7 at 11:22 UTC. The active region will remain a threat for an isolated M-Class flare. In the southeast quadrant, region 2208 is showing new spot growth this morning, but remains remains relatively quiet for now. A coronal mass ejection (CME) was observed off the east limb and is directed away from Earth. This looks to have been the result of activity surrounding old region 2192. The active region will begin to turn back into view during the next couple of days. Magnetic field lines towering high above the active region are now visible in the latest solar imagery. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

November 9, 2014 @ 15:10 UTC
Solar Update / Pair of Eruptions
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Sunday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low with only minor C-Flares detected. The source of these flares, region 2205 now approaching center disk, initially showed signs of slight decay, but will remain a threat for at least M-Class solar flares. An active region now turning into view off the southeast limb was numbered 2208 overnight and appears to be fairly stable. A filament eruption was detected in the northwest quadrant beginning at 08:00 UTC and generated a coronal mass ejection (CME) that looks to be directed north of the ecliptic and away from Earth. Shortly after this event, a prominence eruption observed in the vicinity of 2208 near the east limb was visually impressive, however much of the plasma appears to have been reabsorbed. More details to follow regarding this event if necessary. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

November 8, 2014 @ 15:15 UTC
Geomagnetic Storm Watch Issued
A moderate G2 geomagnetic storm watch has been issued for November 10th. The watch was added as a result of the X1.6 flare and CME event from Friday. When watching the attached video below courtesy of LASCO C2 and C3, you can clearly see that a bulk of plasma is traveling to the north and east and away from our planet. Despite this, sky watchers at high latitudes should remain alert. I do not personally expect G2 storm conditions to materialize, but then again, we have been surprised in the past.

November 8, 2014 @ 16:30 UTC
Solar Update
Hello again folks. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity since the X1.6 solar flare on Friday has been relatively low with only minor C-Class activity detected. Region 2205 remains magnetically complex with a Beta-Gamma-Delta magnetic configuration and will continue to be a threat for another moderate to strong solar flare. All other visible regions are stable. As mentioned in a previous update, the coronal mass ejection (CME) observed following the X1.6 event around region 2205 on Friday appears to be headed mostly away from Earth. Despite this, a geomagnetic storm watch is in effect beginning on Nov. 10 should a portion of the plasma cloud deliver a glancing blow to our geomagnetic field. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest information.

November 7, 2014 @ 18:00 UTC
X-Flare!
Solar activity is once again at high levels. Region 2205 produced a strong X1.6 solar flare peaking at 17:26 UTC Friday. The event was associated with a Type II radio emission with an estimated velocity of 602 km/s. A short lived R2 radio black occurred on the sunlit side of Earth. A coronal mass ejection (CME) is now visible in the latest LASCO C2 imagery. Click HERE for an updated event log.

November 6, 2014 @ 04:45 UTC
Flaring Continues
Region 2205 (Beta-Gamma-Delta) has been very productive since rotating into view off the east limb. Another solar flare, this time a moderately strong M5.4 event, was observed at 03:46 UTC (Nov 6). The latest event was associated with Type II and Type IV radio emissions, indicating another coronal mass ejection (CME) is possible. An earlier M3.0 event at 19:44 UTC (Nov 5) hurled a CME into space and much like all other eruptive events up until this point, looks to be directed to the east and away from Earth. Region 2205 will continue to turn into a better Earth facing position over the next week. The only question is, will the sunspot remain productive? Stay tuned to find out.

November 5, 2014 @ 12:15 UTC
M7.9 Solar flare Observed
Newly numbered sunspot 2205, now in view off the northeast limb, produced a moderately strong M7.9 solar flare at 09:47 UTC Wednesday morning. The event was associated with a 10cm Radio Burst (TenFlare) lasting 6 minutes and measuring 229 solar flux units (SFU), along with a Type II Radio Emission with an estimated velocity of 816 km/s. A faint CME was generated, however due to the location near the east limb, it is not directed towards Earth. Click HERE for video of the flare.

November 4, 2014 @ 13:55 UTC
Solar Update / Sunspot 2205
Good morning. Below is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Tuesday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours reached high levels. Newly numbered region 2205, now in view off the northeast limb, generated a moderately strong M6.5 solar flare at 22:40 UTC (Nov 3). The event was responsible for a 10cm radio burst (TenFlare) lasting 9 minutes and measuring 180 solar flux units (SFU), a Type II radio emission with an estimated velocity of 612 km/s, and a coronal mass ejection (CME) that was directed to the east and away from Earth. Region 2205 was also the source of two M-Flares on Tuesday morning, an M2.6 at 08:38 UTC (Nov 4), followed up by an M2.3 at 09:04 UTC. Another CME was produced, but was also directed away from Earth. We will get a better look at 2205 as the day progresses. Additional flaring may be likely. All other visible sunspot regions are currently stable. As mentioned in a previous update, numerous coronal mass ejections were detected during the past 24 hours, however none appear to be Earth directed at this time. Stay tuned to SolarHam.com for the latest data and imagery.

November 3, 2014 @ 12:15 UTC
Approaching Active Region
Increased activity on the horizon? An active region responsible for farsided coronal mass ejections is about to turn into view off the northeast limb. An M2.2 solar flare was observed Monday morning at 11:53 UTC. We will begin to see the likely sunspot within the next 24-48 hours.

UPDATE: The sunspot, now turning into view off the northeast limb, produced a moderately strong M6.5 solar flare at 22:40 UTC Monday. Additional flaring may be possible. Click HERE for a video.

November 2, 2014 @ 13:00 UTC
Solar Update
Good morning. Here is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Sunday. Earth facing solar activity during the past 24 hours was at very low (X-Rays below C-Class) to low levels (C-Class flares). Regions 2203 and 2204 both showed growth during the past day, while all other visible regions remained fairly stable. There will remain a chance for at least C-Class flares during the next 24 hours. An eruption beyond the northeast limb on Sunday morning flung a coronal mass ejection (CME) into space and away from Earth. The source region will begin to turn into view during the upcoming week. Proton levels streaming past Earth remain elevated, but falls below the minor radiation storm threshold. The increase is likely the result of the filament eruption / CME event on Nov 1.

November 1, 2014 @ 13:00 UTC
Solar Update / Prominence Eruption
Welcome to November! Attached is an updated look at the visible solar disk on Saturday. Solar activity during the past 24 hours was low with only minor C-Class activity detected, including a C4.5 from behind the west limb, and a C4.1 from region 2201 at 10:24 UTC. New sunspots 2203 and 2204 were numbered overnight and do not appear to be very threatening at this time. There will remain a chance for at least C-Class solar flares during the next 24 hours. A prominence eruption in the southeast quadrant beginning at 04:15 UTC produced a coronal mass ejection (CME) that appears to be directed mostly to the east and away from Earth.